Document restoration >> How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos

Designing a preservation program should not be viewed as an arcane process requiring technical expertise in paper chemistry or hands-on conservation skills. It is instead much like other management decision-making: a process for allocating available resources to activities and How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos functions important to carrying out an institution's mission.

Indeed, in order to demystify preservation decision-making, we should think about How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos preservation as an aspect of collection management. Like other institutional programs, the goals and priorities of a preservation program should be firmly rooted in the institutional mission statement. They should also be based on a coherent, well defined How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos collection policy.

If either the mission statement or the collection policy is too general and vague to serve as the basis for planning, it should be rewritten so that it reflects the actual goals of the repository and shows clearly how the collections support these How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos goals.

Preservation of a repository's How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos holdings can be divided into two categories. The first is preventive preservation, which usually focuses on preventing deterioration of the collections as a whole. The second is remedial preservation measures to correct physical or chemical deterioration. Remedial preservation is labor intensive and often requires highly trained professionals to carry it out.

Consequently it is expensive and so is often limited to selected portions of the total collection. Any How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos planning process must be structured to produce a program that will incorporate both categories of activity. PLANNING METHODOLOGIES A standard strategic planning methodology can be applied to preservation planning. Also, a number of specialized tools have been developed to help librarians, archivists, and curators assess their preservation needs and decide on How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos priorities for addressing them.

The Northeast Document Conservation Center's How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos workbook servation Planning: Guidelines for Writing a Long-Range Planis intended to assist institutions that have completed needs assessments in drafting a long-range planning document.

The Association of Research Libraries offers a Preservation Planning Program that, although targeted at large research libraries and intended to be carried out with the assistance of an experienced preservation administrator as a consultant, can How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos provide a useful outline of and information for evaluating the issues that must be considered by any repository.

CALIPR is a computer software package that assists all types of California repositories to carry out a simple preservation needs How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos assessment.

These tools, as well as others in the How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos field, help the administrator evaluate basic components of preservation planning: the extent to which the collections are at risk from a number of factors; the portions of collections of greatest enduring value; the availability of resources in terms of staff time, technical expertise, and How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos financial resources; and the political feasibility of particular actions.

The results of these assessments must be combined to produce a list of priorities. CALCULATING RISK Reliable data on the dimensions of the preservation problem within the repository are needed in order to begin to set institutional How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos preservation priorities.

Information should be collected on the extent and kinds of How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos deterioration present, on the environmental conditions in which materials are stored and used, and on systems and policies, such as fire detection and suppression and security measures, that protect the collections from damage or loss.

TYPES OF SURVEYS

Condition Surveys Many major research libraries have conducted intensive condition surveys of their How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos holdings during the past 15 years. These have produced reliable data on the proportion of acidic paper, the extent of embrittlement and of incomplete text blocks, deterioration of the text or image, and the percentage of damaged bindings or the lack of protective enclosures. There is a considerable How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos literature available on the topic.

Most of these surveys show much the same pattern of How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos deterioration, so that it is probably no longer necessary for any institution to do an intensive quantitative survey unless it has idiosyncratic holdings or has housed them in exceptionally poor environments.

It is, however, useful to have at least a small sampling of one's own collections both to verify that they conform to national patterns and to use as illustrative material in making a budget case or preparing a How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos grant proposal. Environmental Surveys To obtain data for planning purposes on the environment in which the collections are stored and used, one must measure and record temperature and relative humidity in order to obtain a profile of their fluctuations around the clock and throughout the How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos year.

Assistance in setting up a How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos monitoring program can be obtained from regional preservation field service programs, from state libraries with a preservation program, or from a helpful, nearby university library with a preservation administrator.

Assistance from a consultant is often needed to interpret accurately the data collected and to identify options for remedial action. How How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos extensively to monitor the variety of climates that may exist within a repository is a management issue that depends on local conditions and on the extent of the resources available to the repository to conduct such a survey.

In a survey of a repository's environmental conditions, attention should be paid to sources of potential damage from exposure to light from How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos windows or light fixtures.

Ideally, pollution levels would also be evaluated, but realistically most pollution problems must wait for a comprehensive How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos renovation or replacement of an HVAC system.

Surveys of Protective Systems and Practices

In addition, effective planning for a preservation program requires a repository to review the various How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos systems and policies intended to prevent damage to the collections from storage, use, and handling as well as from disasters, vandalism, and theft.

Ascertaining the extent to which protective procedures, systems, and policies are in place allows an assessment of the degree to which collections are exposed to future deterioration and sudden damage or loss. The building fabric should be surveyed to identify possible How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos problems such as leaks or fire hazards. Fire detection and suppression systems should also be assessed.

Security systems, both How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos mechanical and procedural, and disaster planning should be evaluated. It is also essential to examine staff and user training in the care and handling of collections, and to evaluate storage furniture, binding and preservation microfilm contracts, and the storage enclosures and materials used to How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos protect or repair collections.

It may be helpful to track a number of items or collections from acquisition through binding or boxing and foldering, cataloging, shelving, circulation, and inter-library loan in order to identify all the points at which existing procedures and practices might endanger an item. Such an exercise will point up the potentially damaging effects of How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos common practices.

DETERMINING How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos VALUE

Repository staff attempting to develop a strategic plan for a preservation program must also assess the breadth and depth of various portions of the collection in order to determine their intellectual value. In How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos libraries, the Research Libraries Group Conspectus has proved to be a useful tool for this purpose. CALIPR, mentioned earlier, offers four simple questions intended to estimate book collection value within the context of a state's total How To Restore Fire Damaged Archive Photos library resources.

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