Document restoration >> How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos

When reviewing completed work, keep in mind that it is difficult to evaluate technical aspects of a treatment. A good rule of thumb is that all repairs should be discernable to a trained eye, How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos  o that those consulting the materials in the future will not be misled about an item's condition or the nature and extent of previous conservation treatment. 

Repairs should, however, be How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos visually integrated so that the eye is not immediately drawn to them, and they should not clash aesthetically or historically with the item. 

Remember that the nature and severity of damage or deterioration will influence the degree to which the item can be stabilized, strengthened, and aesthetically improved through treatment. SUMMARY Selecting a How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos conservator is a serious proposition, but it need not be daunting. 

It is important to exercise How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos caution and not rashly entrust cultural resources to a person whose judgment and skills are not commensurate with the task. By asking careful questions, contacting references, and working with the conservator before and during treatment, you will be able to obtain competent conservation services. 

In this way, the sometimes delicate chain linking the past and the future will not be broken, and these important resources will remain available to researchers now and in the How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos future. Fasteners such as staples, paper clips, string ties, rubber bands, brads, and straight pins frequently damage documents. 

The damage may be physical: puncturing, tearing or distortion such as creasing. Or chemical damage may result such as staining from the rusting of metal fasteners. Potentially damaging fasteners should be carefully removed from archival documents before they are put into long-term How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos storage. 

Fasteners should always be left in place if removing them will cause damage. Sealing How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos wax, ribbons, thread ties or stitches, and unusual metal fasteners have value as artifacts and/or enhance the value of historic documents. The decision about the retention or removal of such fasteners is a curatorial one. 

When in doubt, these should always be left in place. If records must be kept together by a fastener for the convenience of readers or staff, the National Archives now recommends that a piece of durable, alkaline paper in a card stock weight be folded over the top of the group of documents, with a How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos paper clip slipped over the protective overlay (Figure 1). 

Potentially damaging original fasteners should first be removed. Although they do not stain paper, plastic or coated metal clips will cause distortion of paper and are not recommended. 

REMOVING PAPER CLIPS 

If the paper clip has not rusted and the paper is sturdy, a How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos paper clip can be removed by gently prying it open. The safest How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos method is to place the fastened papers with the short side of the paper clip facing up and the long side against a flat surface (Figure 2).

 Holding the long side of the clip down (through the paper) with one finger, carefully pull up on the short side with the thumb-nail of the other hand. If your fingernails are not long enough to get under the short side of the clip, use a small, How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos flat tool. 

Conservators recommend microspatulas, which are How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos available from sellers of conservation or scientific supplies. With fragile papers or papers to rusted by the clip: gently insert a small piece of Mylar between the clip and the paper on both sides; position the papers, and pry open as above. 

If the paper clip is severely rusted, first loosen it from the paper by scraping through the rust layer very gently with the tip of a microspatula before inserting the Mylar and gently prying the How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos clip open. 

REMOVING STAPLES 

Do not use staple How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos removers. If the staple has not rusted, and the paper is sturdy, a staple can be removed by gently prying the prongs pen and carefully slipping them through the puncture holes. The safest method is to place the stapled papers on a flat work surface with the prongs of the staple facing up. 

Insert the tip of a microspatula between the paper and a prong of the staple and gently pry open one How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos prong at a time (Figure 3). Turn the stapled papers over and insert the microspatula between the staple and the paper, and carefully slip the prongs through the puncture holes (Figure 4). 

With fragile paper, or papers to which the staple has rusted: gently insert a small piece of Mylar between the staple and the paper on both sides (Figure 5); position the How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos papers, and pry open as above. 

Cut Mylar into How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos strips which are slightly smaller than the width of a staple (or tapered) to make the Mylar easier to insert. If the staple is severely rusted, first loosen it from the paper by scraping through the rust layer very gently with the tip of a microspatula before inserting the Mylar and gently prying prongs open and removing the staple.

 Subject to curatorial decision and/or time or labor How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos restrictions, unrusted staples may be left in place during long-term storage of historic documents, provided that environmental conditions are not conducive to rust. Staples should be carefully removed as necessary, for example for photocopying. 

STRAIGHT PINS 

If the straight pin has not rusted, and the paper is sturdy, a straight pin can be removed by gently pulling it through the How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos paper. 

With fragile papers or How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos papers to which the pin has rusted, gently insert a small piece of Mylar between the pin and the paper at all three points of contact and carefully pull the pin through the paper (Figure 6). 

If the straight pin is severely rusted, first loosen it from the paper by scraping through the rust layer very gently with the tip of a microspatula before inserting the Mylar and gently pulling the pin out. 

STRING TIES/RUBBER BANDS 

Cut the tie or band and gently lift it off. Do not attempt to pull these How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos fasteners over the ends of documents. If a rubber band has dried and adhered, gently scrape it off with a microspatula, being careful not to abrade or tear the paper. 

If the rubber band is soft and sticky, do not use solvents. Sticky residue may be gently scraped off with a microspatula. If this residue does not come off easily, interleave the sheets with silicone release paper to keep them from sticking together and consult a How To Restore Fire Damaged Photos conservator.

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