Document restoration >> How To Restore Flood Soaked Books

Microfilming and other types of photo duplication are a cost-effective alternative for preserving information when extensive treatment of the original is not practical. Copying also has advantages when combined with treatment; by eliminating the need to handle fragile materials, copying makes minimal treatment adequate for many books that would otherwise require extensive How To Restore Flood Soaked Books treatment. 

Copying allows added security through off-site storage and also provides researchers with greater access to unique information. Collections in our libraries, archives, and historical societies consist of diverse materials that differ in type, size, and format. They are stored under varying environmental conditions, housed in a variety of boxes and enclosures, and used for various purposes and to different How To Restore Flood Soaked Books extents. 

The net How To Restore Flood Soaked Books result is that the materials in our collections range in condition from pristine to severely deteriorated. Some of these items need conservation attention, and institutions without a conservator on staff must entrust highly valued materials to the care of an individual outside the institution. 

Carefully choosing a conservator is an important step in providing responsible How To Restore Flood Soaked Books conservation. To assist in that process, this publication explores some of the issues related to selecting a conservator. It addresses the nature of conservation; the qualifications and background of a conservator; and how to find, work with, and what to expect from a conservator. 

The focus is on factors relevant to conservation treatment of special collections materials—that is, those materials that are significant as artifacts because of their age, rarity, beauty, historical or bibliographic importance, research potential, or How To Restore Flood Soaked Books monetary value. 

These How To Restore Flood Soaked Books factors are also relevant for those items whose physical features (e.g., color illustrations, folding maps) or size preclude reformatting (either digital or analog) and necessitate preservation of the physical artifact. For these materials, even if the item's intrinsic value may not demand conservation, treatment may be the option of choice. 

Certain items in a collection are so significant that they automatically warrant a How To Restore Flood Soaked Books conservator's attention. Conservation of such items is especially appropriate when the materials cannot withstand use—even careful use—without being damaged, when they are physically or chemically unstable, or when they have received inappropriate treatment in the past. 

CONSERVATION AND THE PROFESSIONAL CONSERVATOR 

Conservation treatment is the application of techniques and materials to chemically stabilize and physically strengthen items in the How To Restore Flood Soaked Books collection. 

The aim of treatment for materials with artifactual value is to assure the item's longevity and continued availability for use, while altering its physical How To Restore Flood Soaked Books characteristics as little as possible. Conservation also includes making decisions about which items need treatment and determining appropriate treatments. 

Conservation treatment of special collections materials requires the judgment and experience of a qualified conservator. A professional How To Restore Flood Soaked Books conservator is a highly trained individual with broad theoretical and practical knowledge in the following areas:

· the history, science, and aesthetics of the materials and techniques used to produce the items in our collections 

· the causes of deterioration or damage to these items 

· the range of methods and materials that can be used in conservation treatment 

· the implications of any proposed How To Restore Flood Soaked Books treatment.   

A How To Restore Flood Soaked Books conservator demonstrates throughout every aspect of his or her work a commitment to high standards of practice. Over the last 20 years, the field of conservation has undergone a period of rapid growth and increasing specialization, especially in the areas of library and archives conservation. 

As yet, however, the field has no educational accreditation system or How To Restore Flood Soaked Books professional certification process. As a result, it may sometimes be difficult to identify and recruit a conservator who is trained and qualified to provide the treatment services required. 

In evaluating prospective conservators, consider the individual's conservation training, length and extent of practical experience, and professional affiliations. In addition, contact client and peer references to ensure that you are making the best, informed How To Restore Flood Soaked Books choice. 

Conservator Training 

Competent How To Restore Flood Soaked Books conservators are trained in one of two ways: through completion of an academic graduate program that leads to a master's degree or through a lengthy apprenticeship. Graduate training programs in North America offer two to three years of academic course work covering the history and science of art and historic artifacts, the cultural context of their production, and conservation treatment practices. 

A final year is spent obtaining intensive practical experience under the direction of a How To Restore Flood Soaked Books respected conservator in an established conservation laboratory. Graduates often undertake an additional year of advanced internship or pursue further study or research opportunities through existing fellowship programs. 

Some individuals choose not to attend a graduate training program because of the program's cost, because its focus does not match their own interests, or for any number of other How To Restore Flood Soaked Books reasons. 

Training through How To Restore Flood Soaked Books apprenticeship offers an alternative for such people. The success of any apprenticeship program relies on the resourcefulness of the individual to obtain broad theoretical and practical knowledge through sustained internships in respected conservation laboratories; attendance at workshops, seminars, and specialized academic courses; and independent reading and study. 

Apprenticeship training is especially common in, and can provide very good preparation for, book conservation, where formal academic training opportunities are limited. Apprenticeship How To Restore Flood Soaked Books training strategies differ considerably from one another and may vary in quality. 

Therefore, it becomes very important to evaluate each individual's training carefully. A trained bookbinder is not necessarily a book conservator. While he or she may possess many of the necessary manual skills, a bookbinder may not have the broader knowledge required to evaluate, propose, and carry out the most appropriate treatment from a How To Restore Flood Soaked Books conservation standpoint. 

Similarly, professional How To Restore Flood Soaked Books framing studios may include "paper restoration" in their list of services, but framers may not have the knowledge required to make conservation decisions. Regardless of their educational training, all conservators specialize in treatment of particular types of materials and can provide only general advice about storage, housing, or maintenance of other materials. 

For example, a responsible How To Restore Flood Soaked Books book conservator will not provide technical consultation or treatment for works of art or furniture since they are outside the realm of his or her expertise. Membership and active involvement in the field's professional organizations indicates a conservator's interest in keeping abreast of technical and scientific developments, in exchanging information, and in strengthening professional How To Restore Flood Soaked Books contacts. 

To achieve these goals, many professional conservators belong to organizations such as the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC), the International Institute for Conservation (IIC), and How To Restore Flood Soaked Books regional conservation organizations. 

While not a guarantee of a conservator's knowledge, competence, or ethics, membership in a professional organization is an important indicator of professional involvement, without which it is almost impossible to keep up with developments in the How To Restore Flood Soaked Books field.

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