Flood Damage >> Flooded Basement

Sanitation & Hygiene in a Flood It is critical for you to remember to practice basic hygiene during the emergency period. Always wash your hands with soap and water that has been boiled or disinfected: before preparing or eating food; after toilet use; Flooded Basement after participating in flood cleanup activities; and after handling articles contaminated with flood water or sewage. 

When clean water is not available, you can use alcohol-based products made for washing hands. Flood waters may contain fecal material from overflowing sewage systems, and agricultural and industrial byproducts. Although skin contact with flood water does not, by itself, Flooded Basement pose a serious health risk, there is some risk of disease from eating or drinking anything contaminated with flood water. 

If you have any open cuts or sores that will be exposed to flood water, keep them as clean as possible by washing well with soap to control infection. If a wound develops redness, swelling, Flooded Basement or drainage, seek immediate medical attention. In addition, parents need to help children avoid waterborne illness. 

Do not allow children to play in flood water areas, wash children's hands frequently (always before meals), Flooded Basement and do not allow children to play with flood-water contaminated toys that have not been disinfected. You can disinfect toys using a solution of one cup of bleach in 5 gallons of water. 

Water for Drinking, Cooking, and Personal Hygiene Safe water for drinking, cooking, and personal hygiene includes bottled, boiled, Flooded Basement or treated water. Your local authorities can make specific recommendations for boiling or treating water in your area. If you get your water from a cistern or a well, please refer to the information on disinfecting cisterns or wells. 

If you do not get your water from a cistern or a well, follow these general rules concerning water for drinking, cooking, and personal hygiene. Do not use contaminated water to wash dishes, brush your teeth, wash and prepare food, wash your hands, make ice, or make baby formula. If possible, Flooded Basement use baby formula that does not need to have water added. 

You can use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer to wash your hands. If you use bottled water, be sure it came from a safe source. If you do not know that the water came from a safe source, you should boil or treat it before you use it. Use only bottled, boiled, Flooded Basement or treated water until your supply is tested and found safe. 

Boiling water, when practical, is the preferred way to kill harmful bacteria and parasites. Bringing water to a rolling boil for 1 minute will kill most organisms. When boiling water is not practical, you can treat water with chlorine tablets, iodine tablets, Flooded Basement or unscented household chlorine bleach (5.25% sodium hypochlorite): 

If you use chlorine tablets or iodine tablets, Flooded Basement follow the directions that come with the tablets. If you use household chlorine bleach, add 1/8 teaspoon (~0.75 mL) of bleach per gallon of water if the water is clear. For cloudy water, add 1/4 teaspoon (~1.50 mL) of bleach per gallon. Mix the solution thoroughly and let it stand for about 30 minutes before using it. 

Note: Treating water with chlorine tablets, iodine tablets, or liquid bleach will not kill parasitic organisms. Use a bleach solution to rinse water containers before reusing them. Use water storage tanks and other types of containers with caution. For example, Flooded Basement fire truck storage tanks and previously used cans or bottles may be contaminated with microbes or chemicals. 

Do not rely on untested devices for decontaminating water. Listen for public announcements on the safety of the municipal water supply. Flooded, Flooded Basement private water wells will need to be tested and disinfected after flood waters recede. Questions about testing should be directed to your local or state health departments. 

Disinfecting Wells If you suspect that your well may be contaminated, contact your local or Flooded Basement state health department or agriculture extension agent for specific advice. Here are some general instructions for disinfecting wells. To Disinfect Bored or Dug Wells 1. Use Table 1 to calculate how much bleach (liquid or granules) to use. 

2. To determine the exact amount to use, Flooded Basement multiply the amount of disinfectant needed (according to the diameter of the well) by the depth of the well. For example, a well 5 feet in diameter requires 4½ cups of bleach per foot of water. If the well is 30 feet deep multiply 4½ by 30 to determine the total cups of bleach required (4½ X 30 = 135 cups). 

There are sixteen cups in each gallon of liquid bleach. 3. Add this total amount of disinfectant to about 10 gallons of water. Splash the mixture around the wall or Flooded Basement lining of the well. Be certain the disinfectant solution contacts all parts of the well. 4. Seal the well top. 5. Open all faucets and pump water until a strong odor of bleach is noticeable at each faucet. 

Then stop the pump and allow the solution to remain in the well overnight. 6. The next day, Flooded Basement operate the pump by turning on all faucets, continuing until the chlorine odor disappears. Adjust the flow of water faucets or fixtures that discharge to septic systems to a low flow to avoid overloading the disposal system. 

To Disinfect Drilled Wells 1. Determine the amount of water in the well by multiplying the gallons per foot by the depth of the well in feet. For example, a well with a 6-inch diameter contains 1.5 gallons of water per foot. If the well is 120 feet deep, multiply 1.5 by 120 (1.5 X 120 = 180). 2. For each 100 gallons of water in the well, Flooded Basement use the amount of chlorine (liquid or granules) indicated in Table 2. 

Mix the total amount of liquid or granules with about 10 gallons of water. 3. Pour the solution into the top of the well before the seal is installed. 4. Connect a hose from a faucet on the discharge side of the pressure tank to the well casing top. Start the pump. Spray the water back into the well and Flooded Basement wash the sides of the casing for at least 15 minutes. 

5. Open every faucet in the system and let the water run until the smell of chlorine can be detected. Then close all the faucets and seal the top of the well. 6. Let stand for several hours, preferably overnight. 7. After you have let the water stand, Flooded Basement operate the pump by turning on all faucets continuing until all odor of chlorine disappears. Adjust the flow of water from faucets or fixtures that discharge into septic tank systems to a low flow to avoid overloading the disposal system.

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