Asbestos Abatement >> Friable Asbestos

How are Friable Asbestos-related diseases detected? Individuals who have been exposed (or suspect they have been exposed) to friable asbestos fibers on the job, through the environment, or at home via a family contact should inform their doctor about their exposure history and whether or not they experience any symptoms. 

The symptoms of Friable Asbestos-related diseases may not become apparent for many decades after the exposure. It is particularly important to check with a doctor if any of the following symptoms develop (6): Shortness of breath, wheezing, or hoarseness. A persistent cough that gets worse over time. Blood in the sputum (fluid) coughed up from the lungs. Pain or tightening in the chest. 

Difficulty swallowing. Swelling of the neck or face. Loss of appetite. Weight loss. Fatigue or anemia. A thorough physical examination, including a chest x-ray and lung function tests, may be recommended. The chest x-ray is currently the most common tool used to detect Friable Asbestos-related diseases. 

However, it is important to note that chest x-rays cannot detect friable asbestos fibers in the lungs, but they can help identify any early signs of lung disease resulting from Friable Asbestos exposure (2). 

Studies have shown that computed tomography (CT) (a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body taken from different angles; Friable Asbestos the pictures are created by a computer linked to an x-ray machine) may be more effective than conventional chest x-rays at detecting friable asbestos-related lung abnormalities in individuals who have been exposed to friable asbestos (12). 

A lung biopsy, which detects microscopic friable asbestos fibers in pieces of lung tissue removed by surgery, is the most reliable test to confirm the presence of friable asbestos-related abnormalities. A bronchoscopy is a less invasive test than a biopsy and Friable Asbestos detects friable asbestos fibers in material that is rinsed out of the lungs. 

It is important to note that these tests cannot determine how much friable asbestos an individual may have been exposed to or whether disease will develop (12). Friable asbestos fibers can also be detected in urine, mucus, or feces, Friable Asbestos but these tests are not reliable for determining how much friable asbestos may be in an individual’s lungs (2). 

How can workers protect themselves from friable asbestos exposure? The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is a component of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) and is the Federal agency responsible for health and safety regulations in maritime, construction, manufacturing, and Friable Asbestos service workplaces. 

OSHA established regulations dealing with friable asbestos exposure on the job, specifically in construction work, shipyards, and Friable Asbestos general industry, that employers are required to follow. In addition, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), another component of the DOL, enforces regulations related to mine safety. 

Workers should use all protective equipment provided by their employers and follow recommended workplace practices and Friable Asbestos safety procedures. For example, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-approved respirators that fit properly should be worn by workers when required. 

Workers who are concerned about friable asbestos exposure in the workplace should discuss the situation with other employees, their employee health and safety representative, and their Friable Asbestos employers. If necessary, OSHA can provide more information or make an inspection. 

Regional offices of OSHA are listed in the "United States Government” section of a telephone directory’s blue pages (under "Department of Labor”). Information about Friable Asbestos regional offices can also be found on OSHA’s website. 

More information about Friable Asbestos is available on OSHA’s Friable asbestos page, which has links to information about friable asbestos in the workplace, including what OSHA standards apply, the hazards of friable asbestos, evaluating friable asbestos exposure, and controls used to protect workers. OSHA’s national office can be contacted at: 

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is another Federal agency that is concerned with Friable Asbestos exposure in the workplace. 

NIOSH conducts friable asbestos-related research, evaluates work sites for possible health hazards, and makes exposure control recommendations. In addition, NIOSH distributes publications on the health effects of friable asbestos exposure and Friable Asbestos can suggest additional sources of information. NIOSH can be contacted at:

How To Clean Mold On Shower Grout

Always handle bleach with caution. Bleach can irritate the eyes, nose, throat and skin. Never mix bleach with ammonia – toxic chlorine gas may result. Open a window or door to provide fresh air while disinfecting. Protect skin and eyes from contact with bleach. Test solution on a small area befor  read more..

Emergency Board Up

To contemplate a multi danger mitigation of earthquake and a post-earthquake Smoke Damage Emergency Board Up, both the single structure level and entire region level must be addressed. Lately implementation of structure in fire damage has been accentuated by federal researchers, particularly after the attacks of ‘  read more..

Natural Disaster Damage

You could also collect some rainwater and Flood Damage Natural Disaster Damage from streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, and natural springs. But you must be sure you boil any water you plan to drink or use for cooking. Do not drink any floodwater, which is very likely to be contaminated; water from water beds, which has pesticide  read more..

Asbestos Shingles

What Should Be Done About asbestos In The Home? If you think asbestos may be in your home, don't panic! Usually the best thing is to LEAVE asbestos material that is in good condition ALONE. Generally, Asbestos Abatement Asbestos Shingles material in good condition will not release asbestos fibers. 

  read more..

If Water Pipe Breaks

PREVENTING OR THAWING FROZEN WATER PIPES Frozen water pipes aren't life threatening, however frozen or broken water pipes do cause damage to homes each winter. If pipes in the walls aren't properly insulated, they can freeze and rupture. (An 1/8-inch crack in a pipe can release up to 250 gallons of   read more..

Asbestos Pipe

Water: Basic Information about Regulated Drinking Water Contaminants You are here: Water Drinking Water Drinking Water Contaminants Basic Information about Asbestos Abatement Asbestos Pipe Regulated Drinking Water Contaminants Basic Information about Asbestos in Drinking Water Basic Information about Asbestos in Drin  read more..

How To Measure Radon Levels

EPA Recommends the Following Testing Steps:Step 1.Take a short-term test. If your result is 4 pCi/L or higher, take a follow-up test (Step 2) to be sure.Step 2. Follow up with either a long-term test or a second short-term test: For a better understanding of your year-round average radon level, Radon Mitigation How To Measure Radon Levels  read more..

Flood Damage

When a flood passes through an area the damage that they can leave could be tremendous, if Electronic Restoration Flood Damage have entered a building containing state-of-the-art electronic equipment. These pieces of equipment will need to be thoroughly dried, gone through having all of the circuit boards and other electri  read more..

How To DIY How To Repair A House Damaged By Smoke

Effects on Smoke on Functional Circuits SNL also tested complete and functional circuit boards for their susceptibility to damage from smoke [18]. These boards contained five functional circuits that could be energized and Smoke Damage How To DIY How To Repair A House Damaged By Smoke monitored during smoke exposure. Each circuit was present twice on   read more..

Forensics

Human remains are treated as a separate and unique type of Crime Scene Cleanup Forensics evidence. An autopsy of the remains is completed to determine the cause and manner of any death that is violent, unusual or untimely. A pathologist will examine the human remains (post-mortem examination) and consider death scene fin  read more..