Asbestos Abatement >> Friable Asbestos

How are Friable Asbestos-related diseases detected? Individuals who have been exposed (or suspect they have been exposed) to friable asbestos fibers on the job, through the environment, or at home via a family contact should inform their doctor about their exposure history and whether or not they experience any symptoms. 

The symptoms of Friable Asbestos-related diseases may not become apparent for many decades after the exposure. It is particularly important to check with a doctor if any of the following symptoms develop (6): Shortness of breath, wheezing, or hoarseness. A persistent cough that gets worse over time. Blood in the sputum (fluid) coughed up from the lungs. Pain or tightening in the chest. 

Difficulty swallowing. Swelling of the neck or face. Loss of appetite. Weight loss. Fatigue or anemia. A thorough physical examination, including a chest x-ray and lung function tests, may be recommended. The chest x-ray is currently the most common tool used to detect Friable Asbestos-related diseases. 

However, it is important to note that chest x-rays cannot detect friable asbestos fibers in the lungs, but they can help identify any early signs of lung disease resulting from Friable Asbestos exposure (2). 

Studies have shown that computed tomography (CT) (a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body taken from different angles; Friable Asbestos the pictures are created by a computer linked to an x-ray machine) may be more effective than conventional chest x-rays at detecting friable asbestos-related lung abnormalities in individuals who have been exposed to friable asbestos (12). 

A lung biopsy, which detects microscopic friable asbestos fibers in pieces of lung tissue removed by surgery, is the most reliable test to confirm the presence of friable asbestos-related abnormalities. A bronchoscopy is a less invasive test than a biopsy and Friable Asbestos detects friable asbestos fibers in material that is rinsed out of the lungs. 

It is important to note that these tests cannot determine how much friable asbestos an individual may have been exposed to or whether disease will develop (12). Friable asbestos fibers can also be detected in urine, mucus, or feces, Friable Asbestos but these tests are not reliable for determining how much friable asbestos may be in an individual’s lungs (2). 

How can workers protect themselves from friable asbestos exposure? The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is a component of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) and is the Federal agency responsible for health and safety regulations in maritime, construction, manufacturing, and Friable Asbestos service workplaces. 

OSHA established regulations dealing with friable asbestos exposure on the job, specifically in construction work, shipyards, and Friable Asbestos general industry, that employers are required to follow. In addition, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), another component of the DOL, enforces regulations related to mine safety. 

Workers should use all protective equipment provided by their employers and follow recommended workplace practices and Friable Asbestos safety procedures. For example, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-approved respirators that fit properly should be worn by workers when required. 

Workers who are concerned about friable asbestos exposure in the workplace should discuss the situation with other employees, their employee health and safety representative, and their Friable Asbestos employers. If necessary, OSHA can provide more information or make an inspection. 

Regional offices of OSHA are listed in the "United States Government” section of a telephone directory’s blue pages (under "Department of Labor”). Information about Friable Asbestos regional offices can also be found on OSHA’s website. 

More information about Friable Asbestos is available on OSHA’s Friable asbestos page, which has links to information about friable asbestos in the workplace, including what OSHA standards apply, the hazards of friable asbestos, evaluating friable asbestos exposure, and controls used to protect workers. OSHA’s national office can be contacted at: 

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is another Federal agency that is concerned with Friable Asbestos exposure in the workplace. 

NIOSH conducts friable asbestos-related research, evaluates work sites for possible health hazards, and makes exposure control recommendations. In addition, NIOSH distributes publications on the health effects of friable asbestos exposure and Friable Asbestos can suggest additional sources of information. NIOSH can be contacted at:

Treatments For Air Duct Mold

There are no laws about mold, but there ARE building codes and public health codes that make sure everyone has safe and healthy housing in Michigan. There are also laws that help protect consumers in Michigan.On the following pages you will find some Mold Remediation Treatments For Air Duct Mold suggestions that may help you addr  read more..

How To Stop Water And Mold In A Crawlspace

Many molds produce numerous protein or glycoprotein allergens capable of causing allergic reactions in people. These allergens have been measured in spores as well as in other fungal fragments. An estimated 6%-10% of the general population and Crawl Space Drying How To Stop Water And Mold In A Crawlspace 15%-50% of those who are genetically susc  read more..

Dehumidify A Flooded Home Without A Dehumidifier

As illustrated in Figure 1, the evaporator (c) and the condenser (e) are the most critical components and dominate the system performance. The evaporator is fitted with a porous tower-packing material, in this case HD Q-PAC® structured media (Lantec Products, Inc., Agoura Hills, CA), Dehumidification Dehumidify A Flooded Home Without A Dehumidifier&n  read more..

Lead Paint In All Construction Work

This section applies to all construction work where an employee may be occupationally exposed to lead. All construction work excluded from coverage in the general industry standard for lead by section 5216(a)(2) is covered by this standard. Construction work is defined as work for construction, alte  read more..

Once A Hurricane Or Major Storm Hits

Once a hurricane or major storm hits, it's too late to protect your home and property. But there are things you can do now to limit future wind damage. Some are fairly simple and inexpensive; others will require a contractor. You'll need to consider the characteristics of your home, Wind Damage Once A Hurricane Or Major Storm Hits y  read more..

How To Test For Lead Paint Poisoning

Appropriate follow-up medical examinations or consultations may also be provided for employees who have been temporarily removed from exposure under the medical removal protection provisions of the standard.(See Part IX, below.) The standard specifies the minimum content of pre-assignment and [  read more..

How To Clean Mold On Shower Grout

Always handle bleach with caution. Bleach can irritate the eyes, nose, throat and skin. Never mix bleach with ammonia – toxic chlorine gas may result. Open a window or door to provide fresh air while disinfecting. Protect skin and eyes from contact with bleach. Test solution on a small area befor  read more..

Toxic Mold

Mold gradually destroy the things they grow on. Prevent damage to building materials and furnishings, save money, and avoid potential health risks by controlling moisture and eliminating mold growth Concern about indoor exposure to mold has been increasing as the public becomes aware that exposure  read more..

OSHA Requirements For Crime Scene Cleanup

Fourth, the fact that nursing homes are subject to infection control requirements imposed by the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under the Medicare and Crime Scene Cleanup OSHA Requirements For Crime Scene Cleanup Medicaid programs and to infection control requirements of states doe  read more..

Crime Scene Cleanup Job Requirements In Pennsylvan

The Crime Scene Response Section is part of the Field Services Laboratory (FSL) of the Laboratory Services Bureau (LSB) and is comprised of thirty seven (37) Crime Scene Specialists (CSSs), five (5) Crime Scene Specialist Squad (Shift) Supervisors, Crime Scene Cleanup Crime Scene Cleanup Job Requirements In Pennsylvan and one (1) Crime Scene Response Uni  read more..