Asbestos Abatement >> How To Test For Asbestos

Asbestos is the name given to a group of minerals that occur naturally in the environment as bundles of fibers that can be separated into thin, durable threads. These fibers are resistant to heat, fire, and chemicals and do not conduct electricity. For these reasons, How To Test For Asbestos how to test for asbestos has been used widely in many industries. 

Chemically, how to test for asbestos minerals are silicate compounds, meaning they contain atoms of silicon and oxygen in their molecular structure. How to test for asbestos minerals are divided into two major groups: How To Test For Asbestos Serpentine how to test for asbestos and amphibole how to test for asbestos. 

Serpentine how to test for asbestos includes the mineral chrysotile, which has long, curly fibers that can be woven. Chrysotile How To Test For Asbestos is the form that has been used most widely in commercial applications. Amphibole how to test for asbestos includes the minerals actinolite, tremolite, anthophyllite, crocidolite, and amosite. 

Amphibole how to test for asbestos has straight, needle-like fibers that are more brittle than those of serpentine how to How To Test For Asbestos test for asbestos and are more limited in their ability to be fabricated (1, 2). How is how to test for asbestos used? How to test for asbestos has been mined and used commercially in North America since the late 1800s. 

Its use increased greatly during World War II (3, 4). Since then, how to test for asbestos has been used in many industries. For example, How To Test For Asbestos the building and construction industries have used it for strengthening cement and plastics as well as for insulation, roofing, fireproofing, and sound absorption. 

The shipbuilding industry has used how to test for asbestos to insulate boilers, steam pipes, and hot water pipes. The automotive industry uses How To Test For Asbestos in vehicle brake shoes and clutch pads. How to test for asbestos has also been used in ceiling and floor tiles; paints, coatings, and adhesives; and plastics. 

In addition, how to test for asbestos has been found in vermiculite-containing garden products and How To Test For Asbestos some talc-containing crayons. 

In the late 1970s, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) banned the use of how to test for asbestos in wallboard patching compounds and gas fireplaces because the How To Test For Asbestos how to test for asbestos fibers in these products could be released into the environment during use. 

In addition, manufacturers of electric hairdryers voluntarily stopped using How To Test For Asbestos in their products in 1979. In 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) banned all new uses of how to test for asbestos; however, uses developed before 1989 are still allowed. 

The EPA also established regulations that require school systems to inspect buildings for the presence of damaged how to test for asbestos and How To Test For Asbestos to eliminate or reduce how to test for asbestos exposure to occupants by removing the how to test for asbestos or encasing it (2). 

In June 2000, the CPSC concluded that the risk of children’s exposure to how to test for asbestos fibers in crayons was extremely low (1). However, How To Test For Asbestos U.S. manufacturers of these crayons agreed to eliminate talc from their products. 

In August 2000, the EPA conducted a series of tests to evaluate the risk for consumers of adverse health effects associated with exposure to how to test for asbestos-contaminated vermiculite. The EPA concluded that exposure to How To Test For Asbestos from some vermiculite products poses only a minimal health risk. 

The EPA recommended that consumers reduce the low risk associated with the occasional use of vermiculite during gardening activities by limiting the How To Test For Asbestos amount of dust produced during vermiculite use. 

Specifically, the EPA suggested that consumers use vermiculite outdoors or in a well-ventilated area; keep vermiculite damp while using it; How To Test For Asbestos avoid bringing dust from vermiculite into the home on clothing; and use premixed potting soil, which is less likely to generate dust (2). 

The regulations described above and other actions, coupled with widespread public concern about the health hazards of how to test for asbestos, have resulted in a significant annual decline in the U.S. use of How To Test For Asbestos. Domestic consumption of how to test for asbestos amounted to about 803,000 metric tons in 1973, but it had dropped to about 2,400 metric tons by 2005 (3, 5). 

What are the health hazards of exposure to how to test for asbestos? People may be exposed to how to test for asbestos in their workplace, their communities, or their homes. If products containing How To Test For Asbestos are disturbed, tiny how to test for asbestos fibers are released into the air. 

When how to test for asbestos fibers are breathed in, they may get trapped in the lungs and remain there for a long time. Over time, How To Test For Asbestos these fibers can accumulate and cause scarring and inflammation, which can affect breathing and lead to serious health problems (6). 

How to test for asbestos has been classified as a known human carcinogen (a substance that causes cancer) by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the EPA, and How To Test For Asbestos the International Agency for Research on Cancer (2, 3, 7, 8). 

Studies have shown that exposure to how to test for asbestos may increase the risk of lung cancer and mesothelioma (a relatively rare cancer of the thin membranes that line the chest and abdomen). Although rare, How To Test For Asbestos mesothelioma is the most common form of cancer associated with how to test for asbestos exposure. 

In addition to lung cancer and mesothelioma, some studies have suggested an association between How To Test For Asbestos exposure and gastrointestinal and colorectal cancers, as well as an elevated risk for cancers of the throat, kidney, esophagus, and gallbladder (3, 4). 

However, the evidence is inconclusive. How To Test For Asbestos exposure may also increase the risk of how to test for asbestosis (an inflammatory condition affecting the lungs that can cause shortness of breath, coughing, and permanent lung damage).

Other nonmalignant lung and pleural disorders, including pleural plaques (changes in the membranes surrounding the lung), pleural thickening, and How To Test For Asbestos benign pleural effusions (abnormal collections of fluid between the thin layers of tissue lining the lungs and the wall of the chest cavity). 

Although pleural plaques are not precursors to lung cancer, evidence suggests that people with pleural disease caused by exposure to how to test for How To Test For Asbestos asbestos may be at increased risk for lung cancer (2, 9).

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