Flood Damage >> FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal

Management and Disposal of Flood Debris In response to the flood disaster, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment ("Department”) is providing guidance and regulatory relief for the FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal management and disposal of damaged or destroyed structures, vegetation debris, vehicles, spoiled food, household chemicals, dead animals, septage and sewage. 

This guidance only applies to flood debris resulting from the September 2013 floods. Flooding can create debris and waste that warrant rapid response. Prompt cleanup and appropriate management of flood debris enables residents to move forward with their lives while minimizing potential public health and FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal environmental issues that may be exacerbated the longer the debris is left in place. 

For instance, prompt cleanup can prevent nuisance conditions, odors, disease, and water contamination from runoff. To enable timely cleanup of flood debris items referenced above, the FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal Department will temporarily not enforce certain regulatory requirements, as described below. The Department’s choice not to apply certain regulatory requirements extends only to flood debris and sediment from the September 2013 floods.

The Department will entertain requests for similar treatment in later years if necessary. The FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal Department is providing a list of landfills (http://goo.gl/maps/l3ksY) that will accept flood debris and waste from the recent flooding. Roll-offs can be taken to any one of the landfills on the list. Please call the landfill contact before transporting loads to alert the landfill that the material is coming and confirm it will accept the waste. 

Handling and Disposal of Flood Debris: A)Vegetation The Department has determined it will not enforce the following FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal regulatory requirements for vegetative debris: 1) Vegetation debris and sediment laying in-place following the flood may be managed by the property owner or the property owner’s contractor in accordance with local (city and county) rules and ordinances. 

The FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal Department will not enforce solid waste requirements so long as the management does not create a nuisance or violate the Water Quality Control Division’s stormwater regulations. 2) Vegetation debris, and sediment transported by stormwater (rain or other forms of precipitation) into ditches, natural or manmade ponds or other low lying areas may be removed to preserve the function of these structures. 

Vegetative debris and sediment wastes, FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal once removed or stockpiled, must be managed in accordance with local (city or county) rules and ordinances. The Department will not enforce solid waste requirements so long as the waste material does not create a nuisance. 3) Vegetation debris should be handled and stored in a manner to prevent a release to storm drains, streams, ditches, and other surface waters. 

Waste should be stored in upland areas away from concentrated stormwater flows, FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal and in a manner that prevents erosion and transport of materials. B)Mud, Soil and Sediment 1) It is important to remember that current sediments are a result of redistribution of soil and sediment. 2) To this point, there have been few reported spills of hazardous materials that have been known to enter flood waters. 

Most flooded areas do not have soil that typically has elevated levels of chemicals or heavy metals. 4) Some of the flood water that carried the sediment may have been contaminated with sewage that does contain bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens. However, FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal this risk can be minimized by avoiding contact with the sediment or appropriate hand washing after contact. 

To further minimize risk, we recommend that remaining sediments be spread out and allowed to dry fully in the sunlight, FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal which will further reduce the concentrations of pathogens in the sediment. 6) Individuals working with the sediment in a way that generates visible dust should consider wearing an N95 respirator as an additional precaution and make sure they wash their hands with soap and water. 

If you have concerns about the sediment, FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal it can be discarded as solid waste. Soil that is comingled with other visible waste or that is visibly stained should be discarded. Objectionable odors may or may not indicate presence of pathogens. When in doubt, throw it out. C) Structures Damaged and destroyed structures may be managed by the property owner or property owner’s contractor. 

Structures that are partially damaged, but safe to enter, FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal can manage house hold hazardous waste (HHW) (i.e., paints, car batteries, pesticides, etc.) at the County or municipal HHW facility. Structures should be handled in a manner that will minimize potential exposures to any unknown hazardous materials that could potentially be present in a damaged structure or debris from structures. 

Older structures have a greater potential to contain asbestos and lead. Some inert debris (nonleachable) and sediment may be disposed of onsite (as described below). If you wish to bring FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal debris from a damaged structure to a landfill, please contact the facility to alert them that flood debris is coming and confirm the landfill will accept the waste. 

Vehicles Fuel, oil, hydraulic fluid, and other automotive fluids along with the battery from a vehicle must be removed and FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal managed appropriately prior to recycling or disposal of the vehicle at a landfill. E) Food Waste Spoiled, contaminated, or expired food managed by residents and businesses may be disposed at a landfill or taken to a composting operation approved to accept food waste. 

Food waste may be managed by the property owner or the property owner’s contractor in accordance with local (city and county) rules and FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal ordinances. The Department will not enforce solid waste requirements so long as the management: 1) does not create a nuisance, 2) does not violate the Water Quality Control Division’s stormwater regulations and 3) is done in accordance with the following criteria.

No food waste shall be placed in any body of water or seasonal creek or pond; 2) Surface water should be diverted from the pit utilizing an upgradient diversion berm or FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal other method; 3) All food waste must be buried at least 150 feet down gradient from any groundwater supply source.

In no case should the bottom of the burial pit be closer than five feet to the groundwater table. 5) The food waste burial is done in accordance with local (city and county) rules and FEMA Flood Maps And Debris Disposal ordinances.

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