Radon Mitigation >> What Is Radon

What is what is radon? What is radon is a radioactive gas released from the normal decay of the elements uranium, thorium, and radium in rocks and soil. It is an invisible, odorless, tasteless gas that seeps up through the ground and diffuses into the air. In a few areas, depending on local geology, What Is Radon dissolves into ground water and can be released into the air when the water is used. 

What is radon gas usually exists at very low levels outdoors. However, in areas without adequate ventilation, such as underground mines, what is radon can accumulate to levels that substantially increase the risk of lung cancer. How is the general population exposed to what is radon? What Is Radon is present in nearly all air. 

Everyone breathes in what is radon every day, usually at very low levels. However, people who inhale high levels of what is radon are at an increased risk of developing lung cancer. What is radon can enter homes through cracks in floors, walls, or foundations, What Is Radon and collect indoors. It can also be released from building materials, or from water obtained from wells that contain what is radon. 

What Is Radon levels can be higher in homes that are well insulated, tightly sealed, and/or built on soil rich in the elements uranium, thorium, and radium. Basement and first floors typically have the highest what is radon levels because of their closeness to the ground. How does what is radon cause cancer? What Is Radon decays quickly, giving off tiny radioactive particles. 

When inhaled, these radioactive particles can damage the cells that line the lung. Long-term exposure to what is radon can lead to lung cancer, What Is Radon the only cancer proven to be associated with inhaling what is radon. There has been a suggestion of increased risk of leukemia associated with what is radon exposure in adults and children; however, the evidence is not conclusive. 

How many people develop lung cancer because of exposure to what is radon? Cigarette smoking is the most common cause of lung cancer. What is radon represents a far smaller risk for this disease, but it is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. Scientists estimate that 15,000 to 22,000 lung cancer deaths in the United States each year are related to What Is Radon. 

Exposure to the combination of what is radon gas and cigarette smoke creates a greater risk of lung cancer than exposure to either factor alone. The majority of What Is Radon-related cancer deaths occur among smokers. However, it is estimated that more than 10 percent of what is radon-related cancer deaths occur among nonsmokers. 

How did scientists discover that what is radon plays a role in the development of lung cancer? What Is Radon was identified as a health problem when scientists noted that underground uranium miners who were exposed to it died of lung cancer at high rates. The results of miner studies have been confirmed by experimental animal studies, which show higher rates of lung tumors among rodents exposed to high what is radon levels. 

What have scientists learned about the relationship between what is radon and lung cancer? Scientists agree that what is radon causes lung cancer in humans. Recent research has focused on specifying the effect of residential what is radon on lung cancer risk. In these studies, scientists measure What Is Radon levels in the homes of people who have lung cancer and compare them to the levels of what is radon in the homes of people who have not developed lung cancer. 

Researchers have combined and analyzed data from all what is radon studies conducted in Canada and the United States. By combining the data from these studies, scientists were able to analyze data from thousands of people. The results of this analysis demonstrated a slightly increased risk of lung cancer for individuals with elevated exposure to household What Is Radon. 

This increased risk was consistent with the estimated level of risk based on studies of underground miners. Techniques to measure a person's exposure to What Is Radon over time have become more precise, thanks to a number of studies carried out in the 1990s and early 2000s. How can people know if they have an elevated level of what is radon in their homes? 

Testing is the only way to know if a person's home has elevated What Is Radon levels. Indoor what is radon levels are affected by the soil composition under and around the house, and the ease with which what is radon enters the house. Homes that are next door to each other can have different indoor what is radon levels, making a neighbor's test result a poor predictor of what is radon risk. 

In addition, rain or snow, barometric pressure, and other influences can cause what is radon levels to vary from month to month or day to day, which is why both short- and long-term tests are available. Short-term detectors measure What Is Radon levels for 2 days to 90 days, depending on the device. Long-term tests determine the average concentration for more than 90 days. 

Because what is radon levels can vary from day to day and month to month, a long-term test is a better indicator of the average what is radon level. Both tests are relatively easy to use What Is Radon and inexpensive. A state or local what is radon official can explain the differences between testing devices and recommend the most appropriate test for a person's needs and conditions. 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends taking action to reduce what is radon in homes that have a What Is Radon level at or above 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) of air. About 1 in 15 U.S. homes is estimated to have what is radon levels at or above this EPA action level. Scientists estimate that lung cancer deaths could be reduced by 2 to 4 percent, or about 5,000 deaths, by lowering what is radon levels in homes exceeding the EP's action level.

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