Mold Remediation >> How To Treat Bathroom Mold


Most of us have seen mold or moisture around the home. But did you know that mold is alive? It grows on wet or damp surfaces. It is often gray or black but can also be white, orange, or green. It can grow out in the open, on places like walls, clothes, and appliances. But you may also find it in more hidden places—under carpets or in walls How To Treat Bathroom Mold and attics. 

Mold often smells musty. Mildew is a common name for mold. If you live near the ocean or in a damp climate, How To Treat Bathroom Mold there may be more mold in your home than in homes in other places. Mold produces "spores," tiny specks you can't see and that float through the air. When you breathe in mold spores, they get into your lungs. 

This can cause health problems. People with allergies to mold may have reactions. They include watery eyes, runny or stuffed up noses, sneezing, itching, wheezing, trouble breathing, headaches, How To Treat Bathroom Mold and tiredness. Mold can even trigger asthma attacks. We are learning more about the health problems mold causes. 

Some molds can cause severe health problems in some people, but scientists disagree about what the problems are. Mold is almost everywhere, How To Treat Bathroom Mold but it is not healthy to live where mold is growing. Because mold needs moisture to grow, try to keep your home and everything in it dry. Here are some places you might find mold:  

In bathrooms, especially around the shower or tub, and on the walls, ceiling, or floor In wet or damp basements How To Treat Bathroom Mold and crawl spaces Around leaky bathroom and kitchen sinks In attics under leaking roofs On wet clothes that are not dried quickly On windows and walls where condensation collects In closets, Under wallpaper or carpet  

In your air conditioner It's important to fix any moisture problem in your home right away. Mold can grow fast, so it's best not to wait. To stop mold from growing, How To Treat Bathroom Mold quickly dry or throw away anything that has gotten wet. How is Your Family's Health? Does anyone have allergies or asthma? Does anyone in your home always seem to have a cold—a runny nose, wheezing, coughing, and headaches?  

Do these problems go away when they leave home for a while? Are there infants, children, How To Treat Bathroom Mold or elderly people living in the household? How Can You Tell if Mold is Growing in Your Home? Can you see mold growing anywhere? Is there mildew growing on clothes or towels? Does any part of your house or apartment smell musty or moldy?  

Do you see color changes on walls How To Treat Bathroom Mold or floors that you can't wipe off? Is There Moisture in Your Home That Could Cause Mold to Grow? Has any part of your home been flooded? Has there been a water leak or overflow? Has the carpet gotten wet and stayed damp for more than 24 hours? Can you see moisture on walls, ceilings, or windows?  

Do bathroom walls stay damp for a long time after a bath or shower? Do basement floor drains ever get clogged How To Treat Bathroom Mold and hold water? Does your basement or roof leak when it rains? (Check the attic floor.) Does anyone use a humidifier? Does water collect in the drain pan under the refrigerator or air conditioner? Do you use unvented space heaters?  

Is there a crawl space under the house? Do you live in a humid climate? Does rainwater drain toward your home's foundation? If your home is raised, does water pool under it? Does the air in your home feel clammy How To Treat Bathroom Mold or humid? Use downspouts to direct rainwater away from the house. Make sure your gutters are working.  

Slope the dirt away from your house's foundation. Make sure the dirt is lower six feet away from the house than it is next to it. Repair leaking roofs, walls, doors, or windows. Keep surfaces clean and dry—wipe up spills and overflows right away. Store clothes How To Treat Bathroom Mold and towels clean and dry—do not let them stay wet in the laundry basket or washing machine.  

Don't leave water in drip pans, basements, How To Treat Bathroom Mold and air conditioners. Check the relative humidity in your home. You can buy a kit to do this at a home electronics or hardware store. Stop using your humidifier if the relative humidity is more than 50%. If the humidity is high, don't keep a lot of houseplants.  

Wipe down shower walls with a squeegee or towel after bathing or How To Treat Bathroom Mold showering. Cut down on steam in the bathroom while bathing or showering. Run a fan that is vented to the outside or open a window. Run a fan vented to the outside when cooking. If you have a dryer, make sure it is vented to the outside.  

Use a dehumidifier or air conditioner to dry out damp areas. If you use a humidifier, How To Treat Bathroom Mold rinse it out with water every day. Every few days, follow the manufacturer's directions for cleaning it or rinse it out with a mix of 1/2 cup chlorine bleach (Sometimes called sodium hypochlorite. "Clorox" is one brand.) and one gallon of water.  

When you use your air conditioner, use the "auto fan" setting. Throw away wet carpeting, cardboard boxes, insulation, How To Treat Bathroom Mold or other things that have been very wet for more than two days. Increase airflow in problem areas— open closet doors and move furniture away from outside walls where mold is growing. 

Move your furniture around once in a while. Prevent moisture from collecting on windows by using storm windows. If you live in an apartment, talk to your landlord about putting on storm windows. Keep people with asthma How To Treat Bathroom Mold or allergies away from damp areas of your home. Cover window wells if they leak.

Mold Mitigation Remediation

Testing is usually done to compare the levels and types of mold spores found inside the building with those found outside of the building or for comparison with another location in the building. In addition, Mold Remediation Mold Mitigation Remediation air sampling may provide tangible evidence supporting a hypothesis that inves  read more..

Prevent A Flood In Your Bathroom

While it can take several days for the larger rivers to flood, flooding caused by ice jams, flooding on the smaller streams, local drainage problems, Flood Damage Prevent A Flood In Your Bathroom and sewer backup can come with little warning.If weather conditions look like flooding, the National Weather Service issues two types o  read more..

How To Remove Smoke Odor From A Kitchen Fire

Comparison of Fire Performance and Corrosion Work by Chapin et al. [25] evaluated the ability of a variety of standard test methods to evaluate the impact of smoke from local area network (LAN) cables on electrical equipment. Their concern was that the specialized and controlled nature of these test  read more..

How To Do Flood Remediation

Disease Risks and Sewage Exposure Flood water often contains raw sewage. Raw sewage can contain certain germs such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites. The risk of illness depends on how you were exposed to the flood water or sewage and how long you were exposed. The most common mode of infection i  read more..

The Advantages And Disadvantages Of Flood Defenses

If the code permits, it is probably best to throw away switches and outlets that were flooded and replace them with new ones. (See Step 5).

3.Check your water system for leaks from pipes that may have moved. (See Step 5). Even if your water supply is not safe to drink, it  read more..

Radon Test Kits

So you have selected a radon test kit and you have tested your home for radon, but now what? This article is for the people who have tested their home for radon and confirmed that yes, they have elevated radon levels, higher than 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). Select a highly qualified radon  read more..

Odor Control

Smoke odor could remain in clothing, your upholstered furniture, carpets and the draperies unless they are properly deodorized before cleaning. That's why professional assistance is recommended. Do not use vacuum attachments or an upright vacuum because the b  read more..

Smoke Inhalation

Exposure to Smoke inhalation from Fires The Smoke inhalation released by any type of fire (forest, brush, crop, structure, tires, waste or wood burning) is a mixture of particles and chemicals produced by incomplete burning of carbon-containing materials. All Fire Damage Smoke Inhalation contains carbon monoxide, carbon di  read more..

Classifications Of Smoke Damage

The maximum optical density, Dm, is used primarily in ranking the relative smoke production of a material and in identifying likely sources of severe smoke production. Concerns with the test include the relatively low heat flux exposure, vertical sample mounting, and Smoke Damage Classifications Of Smoke Damage oxygen supply wit  read more..

Trichotillomania

Trichotillomania Trichotillosis; Compulsive hair pulling Trichotillomania is hair loss from repeated urges to pull or twist the hair until it breaks off. Patients are unable to stop this behavior, even as their hair becomes thinner. A.D.A.M. Causes, incidence, Hoarding Trichotillomania and risk factors Trichot  read more..