Lead Paint Removal >> Lead Paint Abatement

Are the employer acts pursuant to a final medical determination which permits the return of the employee to his or her former job status despite what would otherwise be an unacceptable blood lead level, later questions concerning removing the Lead Paint Abatement employee again shall be decided by a final medical determination. 

The Lead Paint Abatement employer need not automatically remove such an employee pursuant to the blood lead level removal criteria provided by this section. (G) Voluntary Removal or Restriction of an Employee. Where an employer, although not required by this section to do so, removes an employee from exposure to lead or otherwise places limitations on an employee due to the effects of lead exposure on the employee's medical condition, the employer shall provide medical removal protection benefits to the employee equal to that required by Section 5198(k)(5)(A). 

(l) Employee Information and Training. (1) Training Program. (A) Each employer who has a workplace in which there is a potential exposure to airborne lead at any level shall inform employees of the content of Appendices A and B of this regulation. (B) The Lead Paint Abatement employer shall institute a training program for and assure the participation of all employees who are subject to exposure to lead at or above the action level or for whom the possibility exists of skin or eye irritation from exposure to lead. 

(C) The Lead Paint Abatement employer shall provide initial training by 180 days from the effective date for those employees covered by Section 5198(l)(1)(B) on the standard's effective date and prior to the time of initial job assignment for those employees subsequently covered by this paragraph. (D) The training program shall be repeated at least annually for each employee covered by Section 5198(l)(1)(C). 

(E) The Lead Paint Abatement employer shall assure that each employee covered by Section 5198 (l)(1)(C) is informed of the following: 1. The content of this standard and its appendices; 2. The specific nature of the operations which could result in exposure to lead above the action level; 3. The purpose, proper selection, fitting, use, and limitations of respirators; 

4. The Lead Paint Abatement purpose and a description of the medical surveillance program, and the medical removal protection program including infor mation concerning the adverse health effects associated with excessive exposure to lead (with particular attention to the adverse reproduction effects on both males and females); 

5. The engineering controls and work practices associated with the employee's job assignment; 6. The Lead Paint Abatement contents of any compliance plan in effect; and 7. Instructions to employees that chelating agents should not routinely be used to remove lead from their bodies and should not be used at all except under the direction of a licensed physician. 

(2) Access to Information and Training Materials. (A) The Lead Paint Abatement employer shall make a copy of this standard and its appendices readily available to all affected employees including employees exposed below the action level. (B) The employer shall provide, upon request, all materials relating to the employee information and training program to the Chief. 

(m) Signs. (1) General. (A) The Lead Paint Abatement employer may use signs required by other statutes, regulations or ordinances in addition to, or in combination with, signs required by this section. (B) The employer shall assure that no statement appears on or near any sign required by this section which contradicts or detracts from the meaning of the required sign. 

(2) Signs. (A) The Lead Paint Abatement employer shall post the following warning signs in each work area where the PEL is exceeded: WARNING LEAD WORK AREA POISON NO SMOKING OR EATING (B) The employer shall assure that signs required by this section are illuminated and cleaned as necessary so that the legend is readily visible. 

The Lead Paint Abatement employer shall establish and maintain an accurate record of all monitoring required in Section 5198(d). (B) This record shall include: 1. The date(s), number, duration, location and results of each of the samples taken, including a description of the sampling procedure used to determine representative employee exposure where applicable; 

2. A Lead Paint Abatement description of the sampling and analytical methods used and evidence of their accuracy; 3. The type of respiratory protective devices worn, if any; 4. Name, social security number, and job classification of the employee monitored and of all other employees whose exposure the measurement is intended to represent; and 

5. The Lead Paint Abatement environmental variables that could affect the measurement of employee exposure. (C) The employer shall maintain these monitoring records for at least 40 years or for the duration of employment plus 20 years, whichever is longer. (2) Medical Surveillance. (A) The employer shall establish and maintain an accurate record for each employee subject to medical surveillance as required by Section 5198(j). 

(B) This Lead Paint Abatement record shall include: 1. The name, social security number, and description of the duties of the employee; 2. A copy of the physician's written opinions; 3. Results of any monitoring of exposure to airborne lead done for that employee and the representative exposure level supplied to the physician; and 4. Any employee medical complaints related to exposure to lead. 

The Lead Paint Abatement employer shall keep, or assure that the examining physician keeps, the following medical records: 1. A copy of the medical examination results including medical and work history required under Section 5198(j). 2. A description of the laboratory procedures and a copy of any standards or guidelines used to interpret the test results or references to that information. 

3. A copy of the results of biological monitoring. (D) The Lead Paint Abatement employer shall maintain or assure that the physician maintains those medical records for at least 40 years, or for the duration of employment plus 20 years, whichever is longer. The employer shall establish and maintain an accurate record for each employee removed from current exposure to lead pursuant to Section 5198(k). 

(B) Each record shall include: 1. The name and social security number of the employee; 2. The Lead Paint Abatement date on each occasion that the employee was removed from current exposure to lead as well as the corresponding date on which the employee was returned to his or her former job status; 3. A brief explanation of how each removal was or is being accomplished; and 

4. A statement with respect to each removal indicating whether Lead Paint Abatement or not the reason for the removal was an elevated blood lead level. (C) The employer shall maintain each medical removal record for at least the duration of an employee's employment.

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