Lead Paint Removal >> Lead Paint In All Construction Work

This section applies to all construction work where an employee may be occupationally exposed to lead. All construction work excluded from coverage in the general industry standard for lead by section 5216(a)(2) is covered by this standard. Construction work is defined as work for construction, alteration and/or repair, including painting and Lead Paint In All Construction Work  decorating. 

It includes but is not limited to the following: (1) Demolition or salvage of structures where lead or materials containing lead are present; (2) Removal or encapsulation of materials containing lead; (3) New construction, alteration,repair, or Lead Paint In All Construction Work renovation of structures, substrates, or portions thereof, that contain lead, or materials containing lead; 

(4) Installation of products containing lead; Lead Paint In All Construction Work (5) Lead contamination/emergency cleanup; (6) Transportation, disposal, storage, or containment of lead or materials containing lead on the site or location at which construction activities are performed, and (7) Maintenance operations associated with the construction activities described in this subsection. 

(b) Definitions. Action level means employee exposure, without regard to the use ofrespirators, Lead Paint In All Construction Work to an airborne concentration of lead of 30 micrograms per cubic meter of air(30 µg/m3) calculated as an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA). Chief means the Chief of the Division of Occupational Safety and Health or designee. 

Lead means metallic lead, all inorganic lead compounds, and organic lead soaps. Excluded from this definition are all other organic lead compounds. NIOSH means the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or Lead Paint In All Construction Work designee. 

Supervisor means one who is capable of identifying existing and predictable lead hazards in the surroundings or Lead Paint In All Construction Work working conditions and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them. Supervisors shall be trained, as required by this section, and, when required, be certified consistent with section (l)(3). 

(c) Permissible exposure limit. (1) The employer shall assure that no employee is exposed to lead at concentrations greater than fifty micrograms per cubic meter of air (50 µg/m3) averaged over an 8-hour period. (2) If an employee is exposed to lead for more than 8 hours in any work day the employees' allowable exposure, as a time weighted average (TWA) for that day, Lead Paint In All Construction Work shall be reduced according to the following formula: Allowable employee exposure (in µg/m3 ) = 400 divided by hours worked in the day. 

(3) When respirators are used to limit employee exposure as required under subsection (c) and all the requirements of subsections (e)(1) and (f) have been met, Lead Paint In All Construction Work employee exposure may be considered to be at the level provided by the protection factor of the respiratorforthose periods the respiratoris worn. 

Those periods may be averaged with exposure levels during periods when respirators are not worn to determine the employee's daily TWA exposure. (d) Exposure assessment. (1) General. (A) Each employer who has a workplace or Lead Paint In All Construction Work operation covered by this standard shall initially determine if any employee may be exposed to lead at or above the action level. 

(B) Forthe purposes of subsection (d), employee exposure is that exposure which would occur if the employee were not using a respirator. (C) With the exception of monitoring under subsection (d)(3), where monitoring is required underthis section, Lead Paint In All Construction Work the employer shall collect personal samples representative of a full shift including atleast one sample for each job classification in each work area either for each shift orforthe shift with the highest exposure level. 

(D) Full shift personal samples shall be representative of the monitored employee's regular, daily exposure to lead. (2) Protection of employees during assessment of exposure. (A) With respect to the lead related tasks listed in subsection (d)(2)(A), where lead is present, Lead Paint In All Construction Work until the employer performs an employee exposure assessment as required in subsection.

Documents that the employee performing any of the listed tasks is not exposed above the PEL, Lead Paint In All Construction Work the employer shall treat the employee as if the employee were exposed above the PEL, and not in excess of ten (10) times the PEL, and shall implement employee protective measures prescribed in subsection (d)(2)(E). 

The tasks covered by this requirement are: 1. Where lead containing coatings or paint are present: manual demolition of structures (e.g,, dry wall), manual scraping, manual sanding, heat gun applications, and Lead Paint In All Construction Work power tool cleaning with dust collection systems; 2. Spray painting with lead paint (B) In addition, with regard to tasks notlisted in subsection (d)(2)(A).

Where the employer has any reason to believe that an employee performing the task may be exposed to lead in excess of the PEL, Lead Paint In All Construction Work until the employer performs an employee exposure assessment as required by subsection (d) and documents that the employee's lead exposure is not above the PEL the employer shall treat the employee as if the employee were exposed above the PEL and shall implement employee protective measures prescribed in subsection (d)(2)(E). 

(C) With respect to the tasks listed in subsection (d)(2)(C), where lead is present, until the employer performs an employee exposure assessment as required in subsection (d), and Lead Paint In All Construction Work documents that the employee performing any of the listed tasks is not exposed in excess of 500 µg/m3, the employer shall treat the employee as if the employee were exposed to lead in excess of 500 µg/m3 and shall implement employee protective measures as prescribed in subsection (d)(2)(E) of this section. 

Where the employer does establish that the employee is exposed to levels of lead below 500 µg/m3, Lead Paint In All Construction Work the employer may provide the exposed employee with the appropriate respirator prescribed for such use at such lower exposures, in accordance with Table 1 of this section. The tasks covered by this requirement are: 

1. Using lead containing mortar; lead burning 2. Where lead containing coatings or paint are present:rivet busting; powertool cleaning without dust collection systems; cleanup activities where dry expendable abrasives are used; and Lead Paint In All Construction Work abrasive blasting enclosure movement and removal. (D) With respect to the tasks listed in subsection (d)(2)(D), where lead is present.

Until the employer performs an employee exposure assessment as required in subsection (d) and documents that the employee performing any of the listed tasks is not exposed to lead in excess of 2,500 µg/m3 (50 x PEL), Lead Paint In All Construction Work the employer shall treat the employee as if the employee were exposed to lead in excess of 2,500 µg/m3 and shall implement employee protective measures as prescribed in subsection (d)(2)(E).

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