Lead Paint Removal >> Lead Paint Removal Poisoning

Where the employer does establish that the employee is exposed to levels of lead below 2,500 µg/m3, the employer may provide the exposed employee with the appropriate respirator prescribed for use at such lower exposures, in accordance with Table I of this section. Interim protection as described in this subsection is required where lead containing coatings or paint are present on structures when Lead Paint Removal Poisoning performing: 

1. Abrasive blasting, 2. Welding, 3. Cutting, and 4. Torch burning. (E) Until the employer performs an employee exposure assessment as required under subsection (d) and Lead Paint Removal Poisoning determines actual employee exposure, the employer shall provide to employees performing the tasks described in subsections (d)(2)(A),(d)(2)(B), (d)(2)(C), and (d)(2)(D) with interim protection as follows: 1. Appropriate respiratory protection in accordance with subsection (f). 

2. Appropriate personal protective clothing and equipment in accordance with subsection (g). 3. Change areas in accordance with subsection (i)(2). 4. Hand washing facilities in accordance with subsection (i)(5). 5. Biological monitoring in accordance with subsection (j)(1)(A), Lead Paint Removal Poisoning to consist of blood sampling and analysis forlead and zinc protoporphyrin levels, and 

6. Training as required under subsection (l)(1)(A)regarding section 5194, Hazard Communication; training as required under subsection (l)(2)(C),regarding use of respirators; and Lead Paint Removal Poisoning training in accordance with section 1510, Safety Instruction for Employees. (3) Basis of initial determination. 

(A) Except as provided under subsections (d)(3)(C) and (d)(3)(D) the employer shall monitor employee exposures and Lead Paint Removal Poisoning shall base initial determinations on the employee exposure monitoring results and any of the following,relevant considerations: 1. Any information, observations, or calculations which would indicate employee exposure to lead; 

2. Any previous measurements of airborne lead; Lead Paint Removal Poisoning and 3. Any employee complaints of symptoms which may be attributable to exposure to lead. (B) Monitoring forthe initial determination where performed may be limited to a representative sample of the exposed employees who the employer reasonably believes are exposed to the greatest airborne concentrations of lead in the workplace. 

(C) Where the employer has previously monitored forlead exposures, and Lead Paint Removal Poisoning the data were obtained within the past 12 months during work operations conducted under workplace conditions closely resembling the processes, type of material, control methods, work practices, and environmental conditions used and prevailing in the employer's current operations.

The employer may rely on such earlier monitoring results to satisfy the requirements of subsections (d)(3)(A) and (d)(6) if the sampling and analytical methods meet the accuracy and Lead Paint Removal Poisoning confidence levels of subsection (d)(9). (D) Where the employer has objective data, demonstrating that a particular product or material containing lead or a specific process

Operation or activity involving lead cannot resultin employee exposure to lead at or above the action level during processing, use, or Lead Paint Removal Poisoning handling, the employer may rely upon such data instead of implementing initial monitoring. 1. The employer shall establish and maintain an accurate record documenting the nature and relevance of objective data as specified in subsection (n)(4).

Where used in assessing employee exposure in lieu of exposure monitoring. 2. Objective data, Lead Paint Removal Poisoning as described in subsection (d)(3)(D), is not permitted to be used for exposure assessmentin connection with subsection (d)(2). 3. Objective data for surface coatings and materials that contain lead shall meet the following methodology: 

a. Lead analysis shall be performed for each unique surface coating and Lead Paint Removal Poisoning material that may constitute a health hazard to employees engaged in activities within the scope of this section and; Analysis of surface coatings and materials shall be performed in a mannerthat meets the requirements of subsection (d)(9) and shall be recorded, as described in subsection (n)(4). 

(4) Positive initial determination and initial monitoring. (A) Where a determination conducted under subsections (d)(1),(2) and Lead Paint Removal Poisoning (3) shows the possibility of any employee exposure at or above the action level the employer shall conduct monitoring which is representative of the exposure for each employee in the workplace who is exposed to lead. 

(B) Where the employer has previously monitored forlead exposure, and the data were obtained within the past 12 months during work operations conducted under workplace conditions closely resembling the processes, type of material, control methods, work practices, and environmental conditions used and Lead Paint Removal Poisoning prevailing in the employer's current operations.

The employer may rely on such earlier monitoring results to satisfy the requirements of subsection (d)(4)(A) if the sampling and analytical methods meet the accuracy and Lead Paint Removal Poisoning confidence levels of subsection (d)(9). (C) Objective data for an initial assessment that demonstrate surface coating or material that contain lead at concentrations equal to.

Exceeding 0.06% lead dry weight(600 ppm) demonstrate the presence of lead surface coatings or Lead Paint Removal Poisoning material that constitute a health hazard to employees engaged in lead-related construction work. The lead concentration of paint or materials is based on the lead content in the nonvolatile components of the surface coating or material such as paint. 

Objective data as described in this subsection are not permitted to be used in lieu of exposure assessment in connection with lead-related tasks listed in subsection (d)(2). (5) Negative initial determination. (A) Where a determination, Lead Paint Removal Poisoning conducted under subsections (d)(1),(2), and (3) of this section is made that no employee is exposed to airborne concentrations of lead at or above the action level.

The employer shall make a written record of such determination. The record shall include at least the information specified in subsection (d)(3)(i) of this section and Lead Paint Removal Poisoning shall also include the date of determination, location within the work site, and the name and social security number of each employee monitored. 

(B) Objective data that meet the requirements of subsection (n)(4) for an initial assessment that demonstrate surface coating or Lead Paint Removal Poisoning material that contain lead at concentrations less than 0.06% lead dry weight (600 ppm) are sufficient to establish a negative determination. 

The lead concentration of surface coatings or materials is based on the lead content in the nonvolatile components of the surface coating or material such as paint. Objective data as described in this Lead Paint Removal Poisoning subsection are not permitted to be used in lieu of exposure assessment in connection with lead-related tasks listed in subsection (d)(2).

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