Lead Paint Removal >> Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks

Work operations for which engineering controls and work practices are not sufficient to reduce exposures to or below the PEL; (C) Periods when an employee requests a respirator; and (D) Periods when respirators are required to provide interim protection for employees while they perform the operations specified in Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks subsection (d)(2). 

(2) Respirator program. (A) The employer mustimplement a respiratory protection program in accordance with section 5144 (b) (except(d)(1)(C)) through (m). (B) If an employee exhibits breathing difficulty during fit testing orrespirator use, Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks the employer must provide the employee with a medical examination in accordance with subsection (j)(3)(A)2. 

To determine if the employee can use a respirator while performing the required duties. (3) Respirator selection. (A) The employer shall select, and provide to employees, Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks the appropriate respirator or combination ofrespirators specified in Section 5144(d)(3)(A)1. (B) The employer shall provide a powered airpurifying respiratorin lieu of the respirator specified in Section 5144(d)(3)(A)1 whenever: 

1. An employee chooses to use this type of respirator; and Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks 2. This respirator will provide adequate protection to the employee. (C) The employer shall provide employees with a fullfacepiece respiratorinstead of a half mask respiratorfor protection against lead aerosols that may cause eye or skin irritation at the use concentrations. 

(D) The employer shall provide HEPA filters for powered and non-powered air-purifying respirators. (g) Protective work clothing and equipment. (1) Provision and use. Where an employee is exposed to lead above the PEL withoutregard to the use ofrespirators, Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks where employees are exposed to lead compounds which may cause skin or eye irritation (e.g., lead arsenate, lead azide), 

And as interim protection for employees performing tasks as specified in subsection (d)(2), Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks the employer shall provide at no cost to the employee and assure that the employee uses appropriate protective work clothing and equipment that prevents contamination of the employee and the employee's garments such as, but notlimited to: 

(A) Coveralls or similarfull-body work clothing; (B) Gloves, hats, and shoes or disposable shoe coverlets; and Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks (C) Face shields, vented goggles, or other appropriate protective equipment which complies with section 1516. (2) Cleaning and replacement. (A) The employer shall provide the protective clothing required in subsection (g)(1) 

In a clean and dry condition at least weekly, and daily to employees whose exposure levels withoutregard to a respirator are over 200 µg/m3 of lead as an 8-hour TWA. (B) The employer shall provide forthe cleaning, laundering, and Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks disposal of protective clothing and equipmentrequired by subsection (g)(1). (C) The employer shallrepair orreplace required protective clothing and equipment as needed to maintain their effectiveness. 

(D) The employer shall assure that all protective clothing is removed at the completion of a work shift only in change areas provided for that purpose as prescribed in subsection (A)(2). (E) The employer shall assure that contaminated protective clothing which is to be cleaned, laundered, or Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks disposed of, is placed in a closed containerin the change area which prevents dispersion of lead outside the container. 

(F) The employer shall inform in writing any person who cleans orlaunders protective clothing or equipment of the potentially harmful effects of exposure to lead. (G) The employer shall assure that the containers of contaminated protective clothing and equipmentrequired by subsection (g)(2)(E) are labeled as follows: Caution: Clothing contaminated with lead. 

Do not remove dust by blowing or shaking. Dispose of lead contaminated wash water in accordance with applicable local, state, or Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks federalregulations. (H) The employer shall prohibit the removal of lead from protective clothing or equipment by blowing, shaking, or any other means which disperses lead into the air. (h) Housekeeping. 

(1) All surfaces shall be maintained as free as practicable of accumulations of lead. (2) Clean-up of floors and other surfaces where lead accumulates shall wherever possible, Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks be cleaned by vacuuming or other methods that minimize the likelihood of lead becoming airborne. (3) Shoveling, dry or wet sweeping, and brushing may be used only where vacuuming or other equally effective methods have been tried and found not to be effective. 

(4) Where vacuuming methods are selected, the vacuums shall be equipped with HEPA filters and Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks used and emptied in a manner which minimizes the reentry of lead into the workplace. (5) Compressed air shall not be used to remove lead from any surface unless the compressed airis used in conjunction with a ventilation system designed to capture the airborne dust created by the compressed air. 

Hygiene facilities, practices and regulated areas. (1) The employer shall assure thatin areas where employees are exposed to lead above the PEL withoutregard to the use ofrespirators, food or beverage is not present or consumed, tobacco products are not present or used, Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks and cosmetics are not applied. 

(2) Change areas. (A) The employer shall provide clean change areas for employees whose airborne exposure to lead is above the PEL, and Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks as interim protection for employees performing tasks as specified in subsection (d)(2), withoutregard to the use ofrespirators. (B) The employer shall assure that change areas are equipped with separate storage facilities for protective work clothing and equipment and for street clothes which prevent cross contamination. 

(C) The employer shall assure that employees do not leave the workplace wearing any protective clothing or Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks equipment that is required to be worn during the work shift. (3) Showers. (A) The employer shall provide showerfacilities, where feasible,for use by employees whose airborne exposure to lead is above the PEL. 

(B) The employer shall assure, where shower facilities are available, that employees shower atthe end of the work shift and shall provide an adequate supply of cleansing agents and Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks towels for use by affected employees. (A) The employer shall provide lunchroom facilities or eating areas for employees whose airborne exposure to lead is above the PEL, withoutregard to the use ofrespirators. 

(B) The employer shall assure thatlunchroom facilities or eating areas are as free as practicable from lead contamination and Lead Paint Abatement Health Risks are readily accessible to employees. (C) The employer shall assure that employees whose airborne exposure to lead is above the PEL, withoutregard to the use of a respirator, wash their hands and face priorto eating, drinking, smoking or applying cosmetics.

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