Asbestos Abatement >> Asbestos Abatement

How are asbestos abatement-related diseases detected? Individuals who have been exposed (or suspect they have been exposed) to asbestos abatement fibers on the job, through the environment, or at home via a family contact should inform their doctor about their exposure history and whether or Asbestos Abatement not they experience any symptoms. 

The symptoms of asbestos abatement-related diseases may not become apparent for many decades after the exposure. It is particularly important to check with a doctor if any of the following symptoms develop (6): Shortness of breath, wheezing, or Asbestos Abatement hoarseness. A persistent cough that gets worse over time. 

Blood in the sputum (fluid) coughed up from the lungs. Pain or tightening in the chest. Difficulty swallowing. Swelling of the neck or face. Loss of appetite. Weight loss. Fatigue or anemia. A thorough physical examination, including a chest x-ray and lung function tests, Asbestos Abatement may be recommended. 

The chest x-ray is currently the most common tool used to detect asbestos abatement-related diseases. However, it is important to note that chest x-rays cannot detect asbestos abatement fibers in the lungs, Asbestos Abatement but they can help identify any early signs of lung disease resulting from asbestos abatement exposure (2). 

Studies have shown that computed tomography (CT) (a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body taken from different angles; Asbestos Abatement the pictures are created by a computer linked to an x-ray machine) may be more effective than conventional chest x-rays at detecting asbestos abatement-related lung abnormalities in individuals who have been exposed to asbestos abatement. 

A lung biopsy, which detects microscopic asbestos abatement fibers in pieces of lung tissue removed by surgery, Asbestos Abatement is the most reliable test to confirm the presence of asbestos abatement-related abnormalities. A bronchoscopy is a less invasive test than a biopsy and detects asbestos abatement fibers in material that is rinsed out of the lungs. 

It is important to note that these tests cannot determine how much asbestos abatement an individual may have been exposed to or whether disease will develop (12). Asbestos abatement fibers can also be detected in urine, Asbestos Abatement mucus, or feces, but these tests are not reliable for determining how much asbestos abatement may be in an individual’s lungs (2). 

How can workers protect themselves from asbestos abatement exposure? The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is a component of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) and is the Federal agency responsible for health and safety regulations in maritime, construction, manufacturing, and Asbestos Abatement service workplaces. 

OSHA established regulations dealing with asbestos abatement exposure on the job, specifically in construction work, shipyards, and general industry, that employers are required to follow. In addition, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), Asbestos Abatement another component of the DOL, enforces regulations related to mine safety. 

Workers should use all protective equipment provided by their employers and follow recommended workplace practices and safety procedures. For example, Asbestos Abatement National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-approved respirators that fit properly should be worn by workers when required. 

Workers who are concerned about asbestos abatement exposure in the workplace should discuss the situation with other employees, their employee health and safety representative, and Asbestos Abatement their employers. If necessary, OSHA can provide more information or make an inspection.

Regional offices of OSHA are listed in the "United States Government” section of a telephone directory’s blue pages (under "Department of Labor”). Information about regional offices can also be found on Asbestos Abatement OSHA’s website. 

More information about asbestos abatement is available on OSHA’s Asbestos abatement page, which has links to information about asbestos abatement in the workplace, including what OSHA standards apply, the hazards of asbestos abatement, Asbestos Abatement evaluating asbestos abatement exposure, and controls used to protect workers. 

OSHA’s national office can be contacted at: The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Asbestos Abatement is another Federal agency that is concerned with asbestos abatement exposure in the workplace. 

NIOSH conducts asbestos abatement-related research, evaluates work sites for possible health hazards, and Asbestos Abatement makes exposure control recommendations. In addition, NIOSH distributes publications on the health effects of asbestos abatement exposure and can suggest additional sources of information. NIOSH can be contacted.

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