Flood Damage >> Tornado

Tornadoes Tornadoes are nature’s most violent storms. Spawned from powerful thunderstorms, Tornado tornadoes can cause fatalities and devastate a neighborhood in seconds. A tornado appears as a rotating, funnel-shaped cloud that extends from a thunderstorm to the ground with whirling winds that can reach 300 miles per hour.

Damage paths can be in excess of one mile wide and 50 miles long. Every state is at some risk from this hazard. Some tornadoes are clearly visible, while rain or nearby low-hanging clouds obscure others. Occasionally, tornadoes develop so rapidly that little, if any, Tornado advance warning is possible.

Before a tornado hits, the wind may die down and the air may become very still. A cloud of debris can mark the location of a tornado even if a funnel is not visible. Tornadoes generally occur near the trailing edge of a thunderstorm. It is not uncommon to see clear, Tornado sunlit skies behind a tornado.

Before a Tornado

To begin preparing, you should build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan. Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or to commercial radio or Tornado television newscasts for the latest information. In any emergency, always listen to the instructions given by local emergency management officials. Be alert to changing weather conditions.

Look for approaching storms. Look for the following danger signs: Dark, often greenish sky Large hail A large, dark, low-lying cloud (particularly if rotating) Loud roar, similar to a freight train. If you see approaching storms or any of the danger signs, Tornado be prepared to take shelter immediately.

After a Tornado Injury may result from the direct impact of a tornado or it may occur afterward when people walk among debris and enter damaged buildings. A study of injuries after a tornado in Marion, Illinois, showed that 50 percent of the tornado-related injuries were suffered during rescue attempts, cleanup and Tornado other post-tornado activities.

Nearly a third of the injuries resulted from stepping on nails. Because tornadoes often damage power lines, gas lines or Tornado electrical systems, there is a risk of fire, electrocution or an explosion. Protecting yourself and your family requires promptly treating any injuries suffered during the storm and using extreme care to avoid further hazards.

Injuries

Check for injuries. Do not attempt to move seriously injured people unless they are in immediate danger of further injury. Get medical assistance immediately. If someone has stopped breathing, begin CPR if you are trained to do so. Stop a bleeding injury by applying direct pressure to the wound. Have any puncture wound evaluated by a physician. Tornado

If you are trapped, try to attract attention to your location. General Safety Precautions Here are some safety precautions that could help you avoid injury after a tornado: Continue to monitor your battery-powered radio or Tornado television for emergency information. Be careful when entering any structure that has been damaged.

Wear sturdy shoes or boots, long sleeves and gloves when handling or walking on or near debris. Be aware of hazards from exposed nails and broken glass. Do not touch downed power lines or Tornado objects in contact with downed lines. Report electrical hazards to the police and the utility company.

Use battery-powered lanterns, if possible, rather than candles to light homes without electrical power. If you use candles, make sure they are in safe holders away from curtains, paper, wood or Tornado other flammable items. Never leave a candle burning when you are out of the room.

Never use generators, pressure washers, grills, camp stoves or other gasoline, propane, natural gas or charcoal-burning devices inside your home, basement, garage or camper - or even outside near an open window, door or vent. Carbon monoxide (CO) - an odorless, colorless gas that can cause sudden illness and death if you breathe it - from these sources can build up in your home, garage or Tornado camper and poison the people and animals inside.

Seek prompt medical attention if you suspect CO poisoning and are feeling dizzy, light-headed or nauseated. Hang up displaced telephone receivers that may have been knocked off by the tornado, Tornado but stay off the telephone, except to report an emergency. Cooperate fully with public safety officials.

Respond to requests for volunteer assistance by police, fire fighters, emergency management and relief organizations, Tornado but do not go into damaged areas unless assistance has been requested. Your presence could hamper relief efforts and you could endanger yourself.

Inspecting the Damage

After a tornado, be aware of possible structural, electrical or Tornado gas-leak hazards in your home. Contact your local city or county building inspectors for information on structural safety codes and standards. They may also offer suggestions on finding a qualified contractor to do work for you.

In general, if you suspect any damage to your home, shut off electrical power, natural gas and Tornado propane tanks to avoid fire, electrocution or explosions. If it is dark when you are inspecting your home, use a flashlight rather than a candle or torch to avoid the risk of fire or explosion in a damaged home.

If you see frayed wiring or sparks, or if there is an odor of something burning, you should immediately shut off the electrical system at the main circuit breaker if you have not done so already. If you smell gas or suspect a leak, turn off the main gas valve, open all windows and Tornado leave the house immediately.

Notify the gas company, the police or fire departments, or State Fire Marshal's office and do not turn on the lights, light matches, smoke or do anything that could cause a spark. Do not return to your house until you are told it is safe to do so. Safety During Clean Up Wear sturdy shoes or Tornado boots, long sleeves and gloves.

Learn proper safety procedures and operating instructions before operating any gas-powered or electric-powered saws or tools. Clean up spilled medicines, drugs, flammable liquids and Tornado other potentially hazardous materials.

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