Mold Remediation >> Mold Cleanup Procedures

MOLD/WATER DAMAGED MATERIALS Key Engineering Controls and Work Practices Discard all water-damaged materials, materials that are visibly coated with mold that cannot be properly cleaned, such as porous materials (e.g., carpeting, drywall, insulation), Mold Cleanup Procedures and materials that have been wet for more than 48 hours 

Wrap and seal the items that will be discarded in plastic bags Mold Cleanup Procedures or sheets to reduce the spread of spores. These materials can usually be discarded as ordinary debris Minimize dust disturbance to reduce the spread of fungal spores Do not eat, drink, or smoke in work areas Provide natural or local exhaust ventilation during all cleaning steps 

Clean hard and non-porous materials using a detergent. After rinsing, Mold Cleanup Procedures if needed, disinfect with an appropriate biocide such as bleach. Don't mix bleach with ammonia-containing products After an area has been cleaned and is completely dry, vacuum the area with a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) vacuum. 

HEPA vacuums are also recommended for cleaning up dust that may have settled on surfaces outside the work area Additional Personal Protective Equipment N, R, or P95 respirators; Mold Cleanup Procedures either a half-face or full-face N, R, or P 95 respirator for areas smaller then 100 square feet. 

For areas greater than 100 square feet, areas where mold is heavy (blanket coverage rather that patchy), or areas where when substantial dust is generated during cleaning Mold Cleanup Procedures or debris removal (e.g., abrasives are used to clean surfaces), use a full-face respirator with N, R, or P100 filters. Charcoal-impregnated filters may be used for odors. 

When silica is being used for abrasive blasting, an abrasive-blasting respirator must be used Non-vented goggles Protective clothing (e.g., disposable coveralls) to prevent cross contamination and skin contact with mold and chemicals. For areas greater that 100 square feet, Mold Cleanup Procedures ensure that protective clothing covers entire body including head and feet 

Long gloves made of material that will protect user from chemicals handled for surface cleaning MOLD REMEDIATION – SMALL ISOLATED AREAS (i.e., 10 square feet or less of isolated visible mold growth) Key Engineering Controls Mold Cleanup Procedures and Work Practices 

The work area should be unoccupied; removing people from adjacent spaces is not necessary but is recommended for infants, persons recovering from surgery, immune suppressed people, Mold Cleanup Procedures or people with chronic inflammatory lung diseases (e.g., asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and severe allergies) Containment of the work area is not necessary Use dust suppression methods (e.g., misting (not soaking) surfaces prior to remediation) 

Clean and/or remove materials as noted in the Mold/water damaged materials hazard; Mold Cleanup Procedures seal materials being removed in plastic bags The work area and areas used by remediation workers for egress should be cleaned with a damp cloth or mop and a detergent solution Leave area clean, dry, and free of visible debris 

MOLD REMEDIATION – MID-SIZE ISOLATED AREAS (i.e., 10 to 30 contiguous square feet) Key Engineering Controls and Work Practices The work area should be unoccupied; Mold Cleanup Procedures removing people from adjacent spaces is not necessary but is recommended for infants, persons recovering from surgery, immune suppressed people, or people with chronic inflammatory lung diseases (e.g., asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and severe allergies) 

Containment of the work area is not necessary. Cover surfaces in the work area that could become contaminated with secured plastic sheets to contain dust Mold Cleanup Procedures and debris and prevent further contamination Use dust suppression methods (e.g., misting (not soaking) surfaces prior to remediation) Clean and/or remove materials as noted in the section above; seal materials being removed in plastic bags 

The work area and areas used by remediation workers for egress should be cleaned with a damp cloth or mop and a detergent solution Leave area clean, dry, Mold Cleanup Procedures and free of visible debris MOLD REMEDIATION – LARGE ISOLATED AREAS (i.e., 30 to 100 contiguous square feet) Key Engineering Controls and Work Practices Develop a suitable mold remediation plan. 

If abatement procedures are expected to generate a lot of dust (e.g., abrasive cleaning of contaminated surfaces, Mold Cleanup Procedures demolition of plaster walls) or the visible concentration of mold is heavy (i.e., blanket versus patchy coverage) follow the extensive contamination procedures below 

Consult with industrial hygienists or other environmental health and safety professionals with experience performing microbial investigations Mold Cleanup Procedures and/or mold remediation before beginning remediation The work area and areas directly adjacent to it should be unoccupied Cover surfaces in the work area and adjacent areas that could become contaminated with secured plastic sheets to contain dust and debris and prevent further contamination 

Seal ventilation ducts/grills in the work area and areas directly adjacent with plastic sheeting Use dust suppression methods (e.g., misting (not soaking) surfaces prior to remediation) Clean Mold Cleanup Procedures and/or remove materials as noted in the section above. Seal materials being removed in plastic bags The work and surrounding areas should be HEPA vacuumed and cleaned with a damp cloth or mop and a detergent solution All areas should be left dry and free from contamination and debris 

MOLD REMEDIATION – HVAC SYSTEMS Key Engineering Controls and Work Practices Use the recommended work practices and isolation methods listed above; Mold Cleanup Procedures areas <10 square feet may be consideredsmall isolated areas and area >10 square feet should be considered areas with extensive contamination 

Shut down the HVAC system before beginning remedial activities; consult with the building maintenance staff, engineer, or HVAC manufacturer to determine the correct procedures for shutting down system and to identify/locate system components Mold Cleanup Procedures and areas of potential contamination Consult with the HVAC manufacturer to determine which biocide they recommend for use on their HVAC system and components, such as cooling coils and condensation pans 

Remove contaminated materials that can support mold growth, such as the paper on the insulation of interior lined ducts and filters Inspect and clean HVAC system surfaces by removing all dirt, debris, Mold Cleanup Procedures and visible mold. Disinfect mold-impacted surfaces before reusing the system For extensively contaminated areas (i.e., > 10 square feet of contamination), air monitoring with the HVAC system running should be conducted prior to the re-occupancy

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