Flood Damage >> Floods

Is there any way to obtain a community-wide discount on the cost of flood insurance premiums? All communities in the NFIP adopt and enforce minimum standards for managing construction and development in their Special flood Hazard Areas. Some communities want to achieve a higher level of Floods safety and protection for their citizens than achieved through implementing minimum standards. 

When these communities join the NFIP's Community Rating System (CRS), their policyholders may receive a discount on flood insurance premiums. The CRS recognizes communities for their additional efforts to (1) reduce flood damage to insurable property; (2) strengthen and support the Floods insurance aspects of the NFIP; and (3) encourage a comprehensive approach to floodplain management. 

Communities that join the CRS receive a rating according to a point system devised to reflect the level of Floods safety provided through the floodplain management activities they implement. CRS communities are assigned a CRS Class, from Class 9 to Class 1, that establishes the level of premium discount policyholders receive. 

The discount on their annual flood insurance premiums can range from 5% to as much as 45%, based on the community's CRS Class. Policyholders in a CRS Class 9 community receive the lowest discount of 5%. The highest discount of 45% is provided in CRS Class 1 Floods communities and requires the most points. 

The discount applies to policies for Floods properties located in the Special flood Hazard Area that qualify. Properties located outside the Special flood Hazard Area receive smaller discounts. 21a. Why would a community want to join the CRS? Many communities, especially those with severe flood hazards, high rates of growth, or a history of repeated flooding, are aware of the wide range of actions they can take to reduce flood risk in addition to participating in the NFIP. 

These actions keep their citizens safer, minimize property damage, build resiliency, and foster a better quality of life within the community. Joining the CRS enables Floods communities to earn insurance premium reductions for their residents for activities already being implemented by a community. Community participation in the CRS provides a national benchmark by which a community can measure its performance in floodplain management. 

It also provides recognition for a job well done and fosters a sense of community pride. Why don't all NFIP communities join the CRS? Some communities believe that participating in the CRS will be time- consuming and require a considerable time investment on their part. It is true that a CRS-participating community must designate a local Floods official to act as the CRS coordinator and point of contact. 

This person will need to devote some time to become familiar with CRS and complete an Floods application. After the first year, less time is required as the community standardizes its implementation procedures. Certainly, the time commitment for CRS Class 9 or Class 8 communities is much less than that for CRS Class 3, 2, or 1 communities, but the premium discount is also not as great. 

CRS communities report that the additional commitment is well worth the effort in reduced premiums, a safer Floods community, and increased recognition and awareness of flood risk. 22. How can I find out if my community is in the CRS? Individuals can phone the general NFIP information number at 1-800-427-4661 to find out if their community participates in the CRS and to learn about the amount of the premium discount. 

How are flood insurance premiums calculated? A number of Floods factors are considered in determining the premium for flood insurance coverage. They include the amount of coverage purchased; the deductible amount selected; the flood zone; location; age of the building; building occupancy; and design of the building (foundation type). 

For buildings in SFHAs built after the community entered the flood program (Post-FIRM), the elevation of the Floods building in relation to the Base flood Elevation (BFE) is also a factor in determining the premium. 33. Is the purchase of flood insurance mandatory? 

The flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 and the National flood Insurance Reform Act of 1994 mandate that federally regulated, supervised, or insured financial institutions and Federal Agency lenders require flood insurance for Floods buildings located in a participating NFIP community and in an SFHA. Some financial institutions may require flood insurance for properties outside the SFHA as part of their own risk management process. 

Why is there a requirement to purchase flood insurance in communities that have not suffered flood in many years, or ever? A major purpose of the NFIP is to alert Floods communities to the danger of flood and to assist them in reducing potential property losses from flood. Historical flood data are only one element used in determining a community's flood risk. 

More critical determinations can be made by evaluating the community's rainfall and river-flow data, topography, wind velocity, tidal surge, flood-control measures, development (existing and planned), community Floods maps, and other data. Over time, additional development or changes in these factors can alter the flood risk, and flood maps may be revised. 

Why is my lender requiring the purchase of flood insurance? Lenders are mandated under the flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 and the National flood Insurance Reform Act of 1994 to require the purchase of flood insurance by Floods property owners who acquire loans from federally regulated, supervised, or insured financial institutions for the acquisition or improvement of land, facilities, or structures located within or to be located within an SFHA. 

The lender reviews the current NFIP maps for the community in which the property is located to determine its Floods location relative to the published SFHA and completes the Standard flood Hazard Determination Form (SFHDF). If the lender determines that the structure is indeed located within the SFHA and the community is participating in the NFIP.

The borrower is then notified that flood insurance will be required as a condition of receiving the loan. A similar review and notification are completed whenever a loan is sold on the secondary loan market or perhaps when the lender completes a routine Floods review of its mortgage portfolio.

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