Flood Damage >> Tsunami Facts

Tsunami (pronounced soo-n¡-mees), also known as seismic sea waves (mistakenly called "tidal waves”), are a series of enormous waves created by an underwater disturbance such as an earthquake, landslide, volcanic eruption, or meteorite. A Tsunami Facts can move hundreds of miles per hour in the open ocean and smash into land with waves as high as 100 feet or more. 

From the area where the Tsunami Facts originates, waves travel outward in all directions. Once the wave approaches the shore, it builds in height. The topography of the coastline and the ocean floor will influence the size of the wave. There may be more than one wave and the succeeding one may be larger than the one before. 

That is why a small Tsunami at one beach can be a giant wave a few miles away. All Tsunami Facts are potentially dangerous, even though they may not damage every coastline they strike. A Tsunami can strike anywhere along most of the U.S. coastline. The most destructive Tsunami have occurred along the coasts of California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska and Hawaii. Earthquake-induced movement of the ocean floor most often generates Tsunami.

If a major earthquake or landslide occurs close to shore, the first wave in a series could reach the beach in a few minutes, even before a warning is issued. Areas are at greater risk if they are less than 25 feet above sea level and within a mile of the shoreline. Drowning is the most common cause of death associated with a Tsunami Facts. 

Tsunami waves and the receding water are very destructive to structures in the run-up zone. Other hazards include flooding, contamination of drinking water, and Tsunami Facts fires from gas lines or ruptured tanks. Before a Tsunami The following are things you can do to protect yourself, your family and your property from the effects of a Tsunami.

To begin preparing, you should build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan. o Talk to everyone in your household about what to do if a Tsunami Facts occurs. Create and practice an evacuation plan for your family. Familiarity may save your life. Be able to follow your escape route at night and during inclement weather. 

You should be able to reach your safe location on foot within 15 minutes. Practicing your plan makes the appropriate response more of a reaction, Tsunami Facts requiring less thinking during an actual emergency. o If the school evacuation plan requires you to pick your children up from school or from another location. 

Be aware telephone lines during a Tsunami watch or warning may be overloaded and Tsunami Facts routes to and from schools may be jammed. o Knowing your community's warning systems and disaster plans, including evacuation routes. Know the height of your street above sea level and the distance of your street from the coast or other high-risk waters. 

Evacuation orders may be based on these numbers. If you are a tourist, Tsunami Facts familiarize yourself with local Tsunami evacuation protocols. You may be able to safely evacuate to the third floor and higher in reinforced concrete hotel structures. If an earthquake occurs and you are in a coastal area, turn on your radio to learn if there is a Tsunami warning. 

During a Tsunami Follow the evacuation order issued by authorities and evacuate immediately. Take your animals with you. Move inland to higher ground immediately. Pick areas 100 feet (30 meters) above sea level or go as far as 2 miles (3 kilometers) inland, Tsunami Facts away from the coastline. If you cannot get this high or far, go as high or far as you can. 

Every foot inland or upward may make a difference. Stay away from the beach. Never go down to the beach to watch a Tsunami Facts come in. If you can see the wave you are too close to escape it. CAUTION - If there is noticeable recession in water away from the shoreline this is nature's Tsunami warning and it should be heeded. 

You should move away immediately. Save yourself - not your possessions. Remember to help your neighbors who may require special assistance - infants, elderly people, and Tsunami Facts individuals with access or functional needs.

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