Flood Damage >> Tsunami Facts

Tsunami (pronounced soo-n¡-mees), also known as seismic sea waves (mistakenly called "tidal waves”), are a series of enormous waves created by an underwater disturbance such as an earthquake, landslide, volcanic eruption, or meteorite. A Tsunami Facts can move hundreds of miles per hour in the open ocean and smash into land with waves as high as 100 feet or more. 

From the area where the Tsunami Facts originates, waves travel outward in all directions. Once the wave approaches the shore, it builds in height. The topography of the coastline and the ocean floor will influence the size of the wave. There may be more than one wave and the succeeding one may be larger than the one before. 

That is why a small Tsunami at one beach can be a giant wave a few miles away. All Tsunami Facts are potentially dangerous, even though they may not damage every coastline they strike. A Tsunami can strike anywhere along most of the U.S. coastline. The most destructive Tsunami have occurred along the coasts of California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska and Hawaii. Earthquake-induced movement of the ocean floor most often generates Tsunami.

If a major earthquake or landslide occurs close to shore, the first wave in a series could reach the beach in a few minutes, even before a warning is issued. Areas are at greater risk if they are less than 25 feet above sea level and within a mile of the shoreline. Drowning is the most common cause of death associated with a Tsunami Facts. 

Tsunami waves and the receding water are very destructive to structures in the run-up zone. Other hazards include flooding, contamination of drinking water, and Tsunami Facts fires from gas lines or ruptured tanks. Before a Tsunami The following are things you can do to protect yourself, your family and your property from the effects of a Tsunami.

To begin preparing, you should build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan. o Talk to everyone in your household about what to do if a Tsunami Facts occurs. Create and practice an evacuation plan for your family. Familiarity may save your life. Be able to follow your escape route at night and during inclement weather. 

You should be able to reach your safe location on foot within 15 minutes. Practicing your plan makes the appropriate response more of a reaction, Tsunami Facts requiring less thinking during an actual emergency. o If the school evacuation plan requires you to pick your children up from school or from another location. 

Be aware telephone lines during a Tsunami watch or warning may be overloaded and Tsunami Facts routes to and from schools may be jammed. o Knowing your community's warning systems and disaster plans, including evacuation routes. Know the height of your street above sea level and the distance of your street from the coast or other high-risk waters. 

Evacuation orders may be based on these numbers. If you are a tourist, Tsunami Facts familiarize yourself with local Tsunami evacuation protocols. You may be able to safely evacuate to the third floor and higher in reinforced concrete hotel structures. If an earthquake occurs and you are in a coastal area, turn on your radio to learn if there is a Tsunami warning. 

During a Tsunami Follow the evacuation order issued by authorities and evacuate immediately. Take your animals with you. Move inland to higher ground immediately. Pick areas 100 feet (30 meters) above sea level or go as far as 2 miles (3 kilometers) inland, Tsunami Facts away from the coastline. If you cannot get this high or far, go as high or far as you can. 

Every foot inland or upward may make a difference. Stay away from the beach. Never go down to the beach to watch a Tsunami Facts come in. If you can see the wave you are too close to escape it. CAUTION - If there is noticeable recession in water away from the shoreline this is nature's Tsunami warning and it should be heeded. 

You should move away immediately. Save yourself - not your possessions. Remember to help your neighbors who may require special assistance - infants, elderly people, and Tsunami Facts individuals with access or functional needs.

How To Survive A Hurricane

Foundations are at relatively low risk from wind forces, but are at higher risks from water forces in wave erosion zones and flood zones. In flooding and wave erosion zones, Wind Damage How To Survive A Hurricane homes are typically elevated above base flood elevation (BFE), defined as the elevation having a 1% chance of b  read more..

How To Deal With Sewage Backup Into A Basement

A sewer backup creates a stressful and emotional situation for the homeowner/renter. In some cases it may cause health and safety concerns as well as significant property loss. A proper response to a sewer backup can greatly minimize property damage and diminish the threat of illness.Arlington Water  read more..

How To Remove Asbestos Siding

The following recount criterion is for a pair of counts that estimate AC in fibers/cc. The criterion is given at the type-I error level. That is, there is 5% maximum risk that we will reject a pair of counts for the reason that one might be biased, when the large Asbestos Abatement How To Remove Asbestos Siding observed differen  read more..

Lead Soil Removal

Garden topsoil poisoned with lead can pose a health danger if vegetables and fruits from the garden are eaten. We don't typically think of our gardens as dangerous or deadly, but regrettably some garden topsoil does contain deadly levels of lead. We are acqu  read more..

How To Test For Asbestos

Asbestos is the name given to a group of minerals that occur naturally in the environment as bundles of fibers that can be separated into thin, durable threads. These fibers are resistant to heat, fire, and chemicals and do not conduct electricity. For these reasons, Asbestos Abatement How To Test For Asbestos how to test for a  read more..

Water Heater Leaking From The Bottom

After floods, excess moisture and standing water contribute to the growth of mold in homes and other buildings. When returning to a home that has been flooded, be aware that mold may be present and may be a health risk for your family. People at Greatest Risk from Mold People with asthma, allergies   read more..

Water Damage

When dealing with larger Document restoration Water Damage projects additional control measures should be applied for sensitive areas such as patient care, office settings or vivarium areas.  The application of these measures should be made on a case-by-case basis, such as enclose and close off critical areas with p  read more..

Hot Water Extration From Carpet

Benchmark locations were integrated with gener­alized maps of soils and geology covering parts ofOrleans Parish, which lies at the center of the NewOrleans MSA. It is important to note that the soil andgeology data sets were digitized from small-scale,paper, photocopied maps to test the initial con  read more..

Smoke Damage Restoration For Electronics

In Figure 17, the dashed vertical line represents the typical DC leakage current limit for a 150µF, 6.3V device while the solid vertical line represents the limit for a tantalum polymer device. It's clear that one of these capacitors would not have met the MnO2 limit and Electronic Restoration Smoke Damage Restoration For Electronics several ot  read more..

Electronic Restoration

This article ascertains appropriate sewage clean-up processes and safety standards to abide by during a sewage cleanup and Sewage Cleanup Electronic Restoration efforts. These processes are created to protect water restoration cleanup technicians, the public, and our environment from the possible harmful effects connected wit  read more..