Animal Damage >> Animal Damage Control

To be eligible for the State Wildlife Grants (SWG) Program each state was required to develop a Wildlife Action Plan (WAP) and submit it to the National Advisory Acceptance Team (composed of staff from the states and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) by October 2005. Each Plan was required to include eight elements (see link below) that detail the species and habitats covered, the conservation actions proposed, procedures to review the Plan, and Animal Damage Control coordination with the public and other agencies. In Louisiana, the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) was charged with completing the WAP. Development of the WAP was coordinated with other state agencies, federal agencies, conservation groups, universities, industry, and the general public.

The goal of LDWF was to develop a strategy which reflected the knowledge and expertise of stakeholders throughout the state who understood the threats facing the diverse fish and wildlife species of Louisiana.The Louisiana WAP was approved in December 2005 and became the roadmap for the utilization of SWG funds. The Louisiana Wildlife Action Plan was intended to be a living document that would change as conservation priorities shift or as new threats to Louisiana’s wildlife are identified. It should be noted that the WAP is not a regulatory document, a land use Animal Damage Control plan, a land acquisition plan, or a threatened/endangered species plan.The Louisiana WAP identifies 240 species of concern, and details threats to these species, as well as strategies for conserving them.

Additionally, the WAP provides detailed information on 38 terrestrial habitats, 12 aquatic basins, and 5 marine habitats that are critical to the conservation of the species of concern identified in the WAP. Threats to each of these habitats are discussed, and conservation strategies are presentedTo ensure that the WAP remains relevant, it must be fully reviewed and revised every 10 years. The first review and Animal Damage Control revision of the Louisiana WAP must be completed by December 2015, and this effort is currently underway.To learn more about the Louisiana Wildlife Action Plan and to download a PDF of the plan please see the link below. If you would like more information about the Louisiana WAP, or about the revision that is currently underway, please contact SWG Coordinator Sam Holcomb (sholcomb@wlf.la.gov).

The State and Tribal Wildlife Grants (SWG) Program was created by federal legislation in November 2001. The SWG program was established "for the development and implementation of programs for the benefit of wildlife and their habitat, including species that are not hunted or fished”, with the goal of preventing species from being federally listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The inclusion of species that are not hunted or fished is one crucial aspect of the SWG program, as many of these species previously had no existing source of Animal Damage Control funding. In fact, the SWG program has now become the primary federal funding source for non-game conservation nationwide. Another crucial aspect of the SWG program is the focus on proactive conservation measures designed to preclude future ESA listings.

This is important, as conservation is often more effective and Animal Damage Control efficient before species undergo declines sufficient to warrant ESA action.Congress stipulated that each state fish and wildlife agency that wished to participate in the SWG program develop a Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy. In response, LDWF developed a comprehensive planning document to establish conservation needs and guide the use of SWG grant funds for the next 10 years. This document, known as the Wildlife Action Plan (WAP), was submitted for approval to the National Advisory Acceptance Team in October 2005 and subsequently approved in December.

The WAP is the roadmap for non-game conservation in Louisiana, and must be reviewed and revised every ten years to insure that it remains an effective tool for conservation planning and implementation. For more Animal Damage Control information see the Louisiana Wildlife Action Plan page.The SWG program is funded by annual Congressional appropriations. The United States Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) apportions these funds to state fish and wildlife agencies based on the land area and population of each state. Since the inception of the SWG program, the state of Louisiana has received $10,678,752 in federal SWG funding, with an apportionment of $708,882 in fiscal year 2011-2012. State Wildlife Grants can be for either implementation of the WAP, or for planning purposes.

Planning grants must directly support efforts to modify, revise, or update the WAP; implementation grants encompass all other eligible activities, including the collection of biological data to support planning efforts.Louisiana has funded 106 projects through the State Wildlife Grants program to date. Funded SWG projects have included biological inventories, ecological research projects, habitat assessment, habitat management, and the development and maintenance of Animal Damage Control databases. A wide range of species have benefited from SWG funding in Louisiana, including the Louisiana Black Bear, Bald Eagle, Whooping Crane, Swallow-Tailed Kite, Alligator Snapping Turtle, Mississippi Diamondbacked Terrapin, Calcasieu Painted Crawfish, Louisiana Pearlshell Mussel, and Painted Bunting.

For more information on completed and ongoing grants see the Louisiana State Wildlife Grant Projects page.State Wildlife Grant proposals are accepted by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) on an annual basis in the spring, and include Animal Damage Control projects developed by LDWF personnel, non-governmental organizations, and universities. State Wildlife Grant proposals are reviewed by LDWF's SWG Committee, consisting of 17 biologists, including representatives from both the Office of Wildlife and Office of Fisheries.For more information about the State Wildlife Grants Program in Louisiana, contact SWG Coordinator Sam Holcomb (sholcomb@wlf.la.gov).

How To Clean Up After Fire Damage

The correlation is even stronger than just by the day of test. Because each test had a 250 nm probe and a 4500 nm probe, the test-to-test correlation was strong as seen in Figure 11. The strength of the correlation seems to reinforce the variability in the performance of the material and not just un  read more..

The Primary Purpose Of Perimeter Security

Banana, coffee, yucca, and corn crops sustained serious damage across the country, and about 4,000 metric tons of foodstuffs were lost due to damage to storage facilities. Roadways sustained major damage across the island. In Ciego de Avila, the 24-km causeway linking mainland Cuba with the smaller   read more..

How To Keep A Mold Smell Out Of The Crawlspace

The principal perceived advantage of a vented crawl space over an unvented one is that venting may limit radon and moisture-related decay hazards by diluting the crawl space air. Crawl Space Drying How To Keep A Mold Smell Out Of The Crawlspace Additionally, providing a vented crawlspace may make sense in flood-prone areas such as coastal zones subj  read more..

Flood Water Disease Prevention

What should I do if road traffic kicks up dust continually?Sediments present on roadways after flood waters recede can create excessive dust after they dry out and normal traffic flow resumes. Try to avoid breathing the airborne dust to the best Water Damage Flood Water Disease Prevention extent practical. 

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Dehumidification

After your building or house has sustained a fire and the fire department has left, leaving your place a soggy smelly mess, now you must face the task of cleaning the Electronic Restoration Dehumidification. The whole purpose of drying your water damaged electronic equipment is to reduce the amount of time the electronics spen  read more..

How Long Should A Dehumidifier Run Per Day

Unit(s) shall be capable and designed for year-round, 24-hours-a-day operation; and requiring only connections of ducts, utilities, and remote sensors, controllers, Dehumidification How Long Should A Dehumidifier Run Per Day and monitors. 3. Unit(s) shall include active regeneration system for control of dehumidification processes.    read more..

Mold Remediation

So your tenants have moved out. So your tenants without giving you notice and may have moved out. Now you have the task of going in and Tenant Move Out Cleanup Mold Remediation cleaning up. There are so many scenarios on this it's unbelievable. Hopefully you had good tenants and they left the place in decent shape, however this  read more..

Crawlspace Drying

The crawlspace foundation may leak and fill with flood water, this is usually the case with older Flood Damage Crawlspace Drying buildings and actually will protect the foundation walls from collapse if the outside groundwater level is too high. Unfortunately, as flood water passes through your stone and brick foundat  read more..

Tenant Screening

If the tenant decides to move during the term of the lease, the tenant is usually still responsible for therent for the rest of the lease period, unless the dwelling can be rerented earlier. The landlord isresponsible to make a good faith effort to re-rent the property, and may not charge the origin  read more..

Mold Removal Products

Molds are tiny microscopic organisms that digest organic matter and reproduce by releasing spores. Molds are a type of fungi and there are over 100,000 species. In nature, mold helps decompose or break-down leaves, wood and other plant debris. Molds become a problem when they go where they are not w  read more..