Structural Drying >> Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning

Carpet cleaning companies need to be aware of the environmental regulations that apply to them. For these Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning companies, commonly small businesses, it can be difficult to identify and keep up with the environmental laws that apply. To help your company in understanding the environmental laws, this fact sheet outlines the requirements for managing wastewater from carpet cleaning. The environmental terms that are highlighted in bold are defined in the glossary at the end of this fact sheet.

  1. Environmental regulations that apply to carpet cleaning companies. Wastewater generated from carpet cleaning can contain contaminants like detergents, Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning disinfectants, and dirt and carpet fibers. If a carpet cleaning company doesn't properly manage its wastewater, these contaminants can be carried directly into creeks, rivers, wetlands or other surface waters, polluting the water and threatening aquatic life. Under the Clean Water Act, a company cannot discharge process wastewater directly into "waters of the state" without obtaining a permit from the EPA. By directly discharging or allowing wastewater to run into creeks, rivers, lakes, etc., your Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning company can be found in violation of the Clean Water Act.
  2. This includes discharging wastewater into conveyance systems (for example, ditches and storm sewers) that lead to surface waters. The Division of Surface Water at Ohio EPA is responsible for the Clean Water Act regulations and for issuing permits for Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning wastewater discharge activities. In many cases, the local wastewater treatment plants (or POTWs) are also responsible for regulating the companies that discharge wastewater to them. What is the proper way to dispose of wastewater from steam cleaning carpets? The proper way to dispose of wastewater from carpet cleaning is to discharge it to the local POTW through a sanitary sewer. For each Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning site you are working at, inspect the area to find out if there is access to a sanitary sewer. Drains and gutters that are found outside buildings, in parking lots or along the streets are usually NOT sanitary sewers.
  3. They are usually storm sewers that lead directly to a stream, river or other water body. You CANNOT discharge Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning wastewater directly into storm sewers. Also, you should NOT discharge any wastewater into any drain or sewer system if you do not know where it leads. If the business or home where you are working at is connected to a sanitary sewer, you can discharge directly to the POTW from that location. This usually means running wastewater into a utility sink, toilet or floor drain – taking steps to ensure that drains/pipes at the business or home do not get clogged with dirt or fibers. Another Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning option includes collecting the wastewater and arranging for disposal at the local POTW. Some POTWs have designated locations for dropping off trucked wastewater (usually called a "trucked waste disposal site"). Other POTWs require that trucked wastewater be delivered directly to the treatment plant.
  4. You need to contact the POTW ahead of time to find out where wastewater should be taken and if there are any other Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning requirements you need to follow. A large wastewater treatment plant will usually have no problem in handling your wastewater and will require no pretreatment (like oil or grease removal, for example). A smaller treatment plant, however, may have some special requirements for you to follow. If you have any questions about whether the area you are working is connected to a sanitary sewer or about sending wastewater to the POTW, these should be addressed directly to the POTW before beginning the Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning job. Do NOT let wastewater run outside a building or home into a storm sewer. It is also not acceptable to let wastewater run outside and sit in areas such as parking lots or driveways to evaporate off. Also, you should NOT dispose of wastewater into a sanitary sewer through a manhole.
  5. In many areas, there are strict local ordinances against lifting covers and disposing of wastes into manholes. What are my disposal options if I work in a rural area? Businesses and homes located in rural areas may not be connected to a POTW. Many of these Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning locations have residential treatment systems on the property like septic tanks or aeration systems that are used to handle wastewater and sewage. Ohio EPA has strict regulations that prohibit the discharge of industrial wastewater that contains chemical contaminants (like solvents) into septic and aeration systems. Local health departments also have regulations regarding residential treatment systems.
  6. In many Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning cases, they do not recommend that carpet cleaning wastewater be discharged into a system like a septic tank because most cannot handle large quantities of wastewater.If the volume is too great for the system to handle, the wastewater will flow untreated through the system. In addition, carpet fibers and dirt may plug the system. If your company is considering wastewater discharge into a residential treatment system, you can only discharge Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning wastewater that has NO chemical contaminants. In addition, care needs to be taken to ensure that the volume of wastewater is not too great for the system to properly handle. When working in a rural area, you will need to make arrangements to ensure that wastewater is properly managed. Again, this may mean collecting the wastewater and arranging for disposal at the local POTW. What are common Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning violations that Ohio EPA sees?
  7. Common violations include situations where carpet cleaning companies discharge wastewater directly into creeks, rivers, ditches or other "waters of the state." This includes companies that pump or allow wastewater to run directly into storm sewers. Another violation includes failing to properly collect or dispose of wastewater. This includes Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning companies that discharge wastewater into paved parking lots or driveways, allowing wastewater to sit and evaporate. rge to a POTW through the sanitary sewer. This can be at the business or residential site you are working at. You can also arrange for disposal of wastewater at the POTW or at their designated trucked waste disposal site.
  8. Discharging wastewater to a residential treatment system like a septic tank is NOT recommended and discharging Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning wastewater that contains contaminants (like solvents) into such a system is strictly PROHIBITED. NEVER discharge directly to storm sewers or waters of the state (such as ponds, streams, ditches, wetlands, lakes etc.). DO NOT discharge and allow Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning wastewater to sit in areas such as parking lots, catch basins, driveways, etc. By taking steps to ensure that wastewater from your carpet cleaning business is properly managed, you can avoid the possibility of fines or violations and help keep our water resources clean. If you have any additional questions on proper disposal of wastewater, contact your local Ohio EPA district office, Division of Surface Water.
  9. See map for contacts. Questions about discharging wastewater into POTWs should be addressed to the pretreatment coordinator at your local Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning wastewater treatment plant. You can also contact Ohio EPA's Office of Compliance Assistance and Pollution Prevention (OCAPP) for help. OCAPP is a non-regulatory office of Ohio EPA with a goal of helping small businesses comply with environmental Carpet Cleaning And Upholstery Cleaning regulations and permitting requirements. If you are operating a small business with fewer than 100 employees, we can help you!

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