Structural Drying >> After Roof Collapse

The standard provides flood, wind, and seismic resistant installation procedures. It also calls for elevating A Zone manufactured homes with the bottom of the main chassis frame beam at or above the BFE, not with the top of the floor at the BFE. How High Above the BFE Should a Building be After Roof Collapse Elevated? 

Ultimately, the building elevation will depend on several factors, all of which must be considered before a final determination is made: The accuracy of the BFE shown on the FIRM: If the BFE is suspect, After Roof Collapse it is probably best to elevate several feet above the BFE; if the BFE is deemed accurate, it may only be necessary to elevate a couple of feet above the BFE. 

Availability of Advisory Base Flood Elevations (ABFEs): ABFEs have been produced for coastal areas following Hurricanes Ivan, Katrina, and Rita. These elevations are intended to be interim recommendations until new FISs can be completed. Some After Roof Collapse communities have adopted ABFEs, but not all (see the Hurricane Katrina Recovery Advisory posted at http://www.fema.gov/pdf/rebuild/mat/reconst_guidance.pdf). 

Future conditions: Since the FIRM reflects conditions at the time of the FIS, some owners or jurisdictions may wish to consider future conditions (such as sea level rise, wetland loss, shoreline erosion, increased storm frequency/intensity, After Roof Collapse and levee settlement/failure) when they decide how high to elevate. 

State or local requirements: The state or local jurisdiction may require a minimum free board through its floodplain management regulations. Building code requirements: The International Building Code (IBC) requires buildings be designed After Roof Collapse and constructed in accordance with ASCE 24 (Standard for Flood Resistant Design and Construction). 

ASCE 24 requires between 0 and 2 feet of freeboard, depending on the building importance After Roof Collapse and the edition of ASCE 24 referenced. [footnote 3]Footnote 3. The 1998 edition of ASCE 24 is referenced by the 2003 edition of the IBC, and requires between 0 and 1 feet of freeboard. The 2005 edition of ASCE 24 is referenced by the 2006 edition of the IBC, and requires between 0 and 2 feet of freeboard. [end footnote] 

Critical and essential facilities: Given the importance of these facilities, some of which must remain operational during a hurricane, they should be elevated higher than most commercial and residential buildings. Building owner tolerance for damage, After Roof Collapse displacement, and downtime: Some building owners may wish to avoid building damage and disruption, and may choose to elevate far above the BFE (see Figures 12 and 13).Figure 12 caption. 

Ocean Springs, Mississippi, After Roof Collapse home elevated approximately 14 feet above the BFE. Katrina flooding was 4 feet below the elevated floor (photo taken after the storm surge had dropped several feet. Courtesy of Ocean Springs, Mississippi, fire chief). [end caption]Figure 13 caption. Pass Christian, Mississippi, home elevated on reinforced concrete columns in Zone A, with the bottom of the floor beam elevated approximately 9 feet above the BFE. 

Although Katrina flooding was approximately 4 feet above the top of the lowest elevated floor, After Roof Collapse the home sustained no structural damage. All other buildings in the vicinity were destroyed. [end caption]The Hurricane Katrina Summary Report on Building Performance (FEMA 548) recommends that critical and essential facilities be elevated to the 500-year flood elevation or based on the requirements of ASCE 24-05, whichever is higher. 

This recommendation may also be appropriate for residential and commercial structures, After Roof Collapse as well.The 500-year elevation can be approximated as 1.5 times the 500-year stillwater depth (500-year stillwater elevation minus the ground elevation) added to the ground elevation. This procedure is similar to the procedure used to calculate ABFEs, but with a different stillwater level.

[Begin text box]If the 500-year stillwater elevation (feet North American Vertical Datum of 1988 [NAVD] or feet National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 [NGVD]) is not available, After Roof Collapse a rule of thumb can be used to approximate it as 1.25 times the 100-year stillwater elevation (feet NAVD or feet NGVD).[end text box]Coastal A Zones

The Coastal A Zone is the area where wave heights between 1.5 and 3.0 feet are expected during the base flood. It is recommended that buildings in this area, with a few exceptions, After Roof Collapse be designed and constructed similar to V Zone buildings. See the Hurricane Katrina Recovery Advisory at http://www.fema.gov/pdf/rebuild/mat/coastal_a_zones.pdf for details.

Other ConsiderationsAs previously stated, in addition to reduced building damage, there are other reasons to design for flood levels above the BFE: Reduced building maintenance After Roof Collapse and longer building life Reduced flood insurance premiums Reduced displacement and dislocation of building occupants after floods (and need for temporary shelter and assistance)  

Reduced job loss Increased retention of tax baseUntil flooded, many homeowners and communities don't think about these benefits. However, After Roof Collapse one of the most persuasive (to homeowners) arguments for elevating homes above the BFE is the reduction in annual flood insurance premiums. 

In most cases, flood premiums can be cut in half by elevating a home 2 feet above the BFE, saving several hundred dollars per year in A Zones, and $2,000 or more per year in V Zones. In V Zones, After Roof Collapse savings continue to increase with added freeboard.[Begin table]Flood Insurance Premium Reductions Can Be Significant Example 

1: V Zone building, supported on piles After Roof Collapse or piers, no below-BFE enclosure or obstruction. $250,000 building coverage, $100,000 contents coverage. Floor Elevation above BFE: 1 foot Reduction in Annual Flood Premium: 25%Floor Elevation above BFE: 2 feet Reduction in Annual Flood Premium: 50% Floor Elevation above BFE: 3 feet Reduction in Annual Flood Premium: 

Floor Elevation above BFE: 4 feet Reduction in Annual Flood Premium: 67% Example 2: A Zone building, slab or crawlspace foundation (no basement). $200,000 building After Roof Collapse coverage, $75,000 contents coverage.Floor Elevation above BFE: 1 foot Reduction in Annual Flood Premium: 39%Floor Elevation above BFE: 

2 feet Reduction in Annual Flood Premium: 48% Floor Elevation above BFE: 3 feet Reduction in Annual Flood Premium: 48%Floor Elevation above BFE: 4 feet Reduction in Annual Flood Premium: 48% Compared After Roof Collapse to flood premium with lowest floor at BFE 

Fire Damage Restoration For Electronics

Figure 11 shows a portion of the metal lead frame strip to which the individual capacitor elements will be attached in the early stages of the capacitor assembly process. The precise dimensions of the lead frame vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, but the function is the same. The leadframe prov  read more..

Mold Caused By Basement Flooding

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT FLOODING, MOLDS, AND HEALTH Q. What does "thoroughly washed" mean? A. Washed in hot, soapy water. Q. What should I do about the floors, walls, and ceilings? A. Vinyl floors, drywall, insulation, and in some cases ceilings should be removed Mold Remediation Mold Caused By Basement Flooding and replaced  read more..

Asbestos Abatement Training

The asbestos awareness training that is provided by OSHA is for workers in a number of different industries, including the construction industry to gain knowledge about the risks of Asbestos Abatement Asbestos Abatement Training. The employees working in the manufacturing industry are also at risk for a significant amount of exposure  read more..

Water Extraction

Cleaning up after a Sewage Cleanup Water Extraction overflow is a necessary job that everyone must engage in during attempts to restore our homes and businesses. Though the overflow might have ended, water restoration workers might continue to face a number of dangers during the sewage cleanup procedure. As a consequen  read more..

Biggest Tornado Disasters

A downburst cluster itself is made up of several downbursts. A downburst is an area of strong, often damaging wind produced by a convective downdraft with the overall size of the downburst varying from 4 to 6 miles (8 to 10 kilometers). Within the downbursts are microbursts; Wind Damage Biggest Tornado Disasters smal  read more..

How To Remove Tiles With Asbestos

Preparing the Work Area Disabling HVAC Systems: The power to the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems that service the Asbestos Abatement How To Remove Tiles With Asbestos restricted area must be deactivated and locked off. All ducts, grills, access ports, windows and vents must be sealed off with two layers of plastic to   read more..

How To Disinfect After Sewer Problems In A Basemen

It will probably never happen at your home, but in case it does, it's important to have the facts in advance. Remember, if you experience a sewer line blockage, Sewage Cleanup How To Disinfect After Sewer Problems In A Basemen call us first. This could save the unnecessary expense of a plumber. IF AN OVERFLOW OCCURS 1. Discontinue inside water use.2  read more..

What Is Needed To Be A Crime Scene Technician

Sometimes total electrical isolation is a good thing— and that's the idea behind a power-over-fiber (PoF) communications cable being developed by Sandia engineers. "It's common to isolate communications between systems or devices by using fiber optic cables, but if power is required, Crime Scene Cleanup What Is Needed To Be A Crime Scene Technician   read more..

How To Remove Residential Lead Paint

Lead test kits are products sold to consumers for use in detecting the presence of lead.Historically, test kits have been developed to detect lead-based paint as defined by the "Lead Safe Housing Rule," (24 C.F.R. Part 35). Under this rule, administered by the Department of Housing and Urban Develop  read more..

Water Extraction Equipment For Upholstery Cleaning

FEMA Grant Helps Restore New Orleans' Katrina-Damaged Archives Release date: FEBRUARY 3, 2012 Release Number:1603-963 NEW ORLEANS, La. 

The Federal Emergency Management Agency announced today approximately $1.7 million in public assistance funding to restore New Orle  read more..