Structural Drying >> After Roof Collapse

The standard provides flood, wind, and seismic resistant installation procedures. It also calls for elevating A Zone manufactured homes with the bottom of the main chassis frame beam at or above the BFE, not with the top of the floor at the BFE. How High Above the BFE Should a Building be After Roof Collapse Elevated? 

Ultimately, the building elevation will depend on several factors, all of which must be considered before a final determination is made: The accuracy of the BFE shown on the FIRM: If the BFE is suspect, After Roof Collapse it is probably best to elevate several feet above the BFE; if the BFE is deemed accurate, it may only be necessary to elevate a couple of feet above the BFE. 

Availability of Advisory Base Flood Elevations (ABFEs): ABFEs have been produced for coastal areas following Hurricanes Ivan, Katrina, and Rita. These elevations are intended to be interim recommendations until new FISs can be completed. Some After Roof Collapse communities have adopted ABFEs, but not all (see the Hurricane Katrina Recovery Advisory posted at http://www.fema.gov/pdf/rebuild/mat/reconst_guidance.pdf). 

Future conditions: Since the FIRM reflects conditions at the time of the FIS, some owners or jurisdictions may wish to consider future conditions (such as sea level rise, wetland loss, shoreline erosion, increased storm frequency/intensity, After Roof Collapse and levee settlement/failure) when they decide how high to elevate. 

State or local requirements: The state or local jurisdiction may require a minimum free board through its floodplain management regulations. Building code requirements: The International Building Code (IBC) requires buildings be designed After Roof Collapse and constructed in accordance with ASCE 24 (Standard for Flood Resistant Design and Construction). 

ASCE 24 requires between 0 and 2 feet of freeboard, depending on the building importance After Roof Collapse and the edition of ASCE 24 referenced. [footnote 3]Footnote 3. The 1998 edition of ASCE 24 is referenced by the 2003 edition of the IBC, and requires between 0 and 1 feet of freeboard. The 2005 edition of ASCE 24 is referenced by the 2006 edition of the IBC, and requires between 0 and 2 feet of freeboard. [end footnote] 

Critical and essential facilities: Given the importance of these facilities, some of which must remain operational during a hurricane, they should be elevated higher than most commercial and residential buildings. Building owner tolerance for damage, After Roof Collapse displacement, and downtime: Some building owners may wish to avoid building damage and disruption, and may choose to elevate far above the BFE (see Figures 12 and 13).Figure 12 caption. 

Ocean Springs, Mississippi, After Roof Collapse home elevated approximately 14 feet above the BFE. Katrina flooding was 4 feet below the elevated floor (photo taken after the storm surge had dropped several feet. Courtesy of Ocean Springs, Mississippi, fire chief). [end caption]Figure 13 caption. Pass Christian, Mississippi, home elevated on reinforced concrete columns in Zone A, with the bottom of the floor beam elevated approximately 9 feet above the BFE. 

Although Katrina flooding was approximately 4 feet above the top of the lowest elevated floor, After Roof Collapse the home sustained no structural damage. All other buildings in the vicinity were destroyed. [end caption]The Hurricane Katrina Summary Report on Building Performance (FEMA 548) recommends that critical and essential facilities be elevated to the 500-year flood elevation or based on the requirements of ASCE 24-05, whichever is higher. 

This recommendation may also be appropriate for residential and commercial structures, After Roof Collapse as well.The 500-year elevation can be approximated as 1.5 times the 500-year stillwater depth (500-year stillwater elevation minus the ground elevation) added to the ground elevation. This procedure is similar to the procedure used to calculate ABFEs, but with a different stillwater level.

[Begin text box]If the 500-year stillwater elevation (feet North American Vertical Datum of 1988 [NAVD] or feet National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 [NGVD]) is not available, After Roof Collapse a rule of thumb can be used to approximate it as 1.25 times the 100-year stillwater elevation (feet NAVD or feet NGVD).[end text box]Coastal A Zones

The Coastal A Zone is the area where wave heights between 1.5 and 3.0 feet are expected during the base flood. It is recommended that buildings in this area, with a few exceptions, After Roof Collapse be designed and constructed similar to V Zone buildings. See the Hurricane Katrina Recovery Advisory at http://www.fema.gov/pdf/rebuild/mat/coastal_a_zones.pdf for details.

Other ConsiderationsAs previously stated, in addition to reduced building damage, there are other reasons to design for flood levels above the BFE: Reduced building maintenance After Roof Collapse and longer building life Reduced flood insurance premiums Reduced displacement and dislocation of building occupants after floods (and need for temporary shelter and assistance)  

Reduced job loss Increased retention of tax baseUntil flooded, many homeowners and communities don't think about these benefits. However, After Roof Collapse one of the most persuasive (to homeowners) arguments for elevating homes above the BFE is the reduction in annual flood insurance premiums. 

In most cases, flood premiums can be cut in half by elevating a home 2 feet above the BFE, saving several hundred dollars per year in A Zones, and $2,000 or more per year in V Zones. In V Zones, After Roof Collapse savings continue to increase with added freeboard.[Begin table]Flood Insurance Premium Reductions Can Be Significant Example 

1: V Zone building, supported on piles After Roof Collapse or piers, no below-BFE enclosure or obstruction. $250,000 building coverage, $100,000 contents coverage. Floor Elevation above BFE: 1 foot Reduction in Annual Flood Premium: 25%Floor Elevation above BFE: 2 feet Reduction in Annual Flood Premium: 50% Floor Elevation above BFE: 3 feet Reduction in Annual Flood Premium: 

Floor Elevation above BFE: 4 feet Reduction in Annual Flood Premium: 67% Example 2: A Zone building, slab or crawlspace foundation (no basement). $200,000 building After Roof Collapse coverage, $75,000 contents coverage.Floor Elevation above BFE: 1 foot Reduction in Annual Flood Premium: 39%Floor Elevation above BFE: 

2 feet Reduction in Annual Flood Premium: 48% Floor Elevation above BFE: 3 feet Reduction in Annual Flood Premium: 48%Floor Elevation above BFE: 4 feet Reduction in Annual Flood Premium: 48% Compared After Roof Collapse to flood premium with lowest floor at BFE 

Colorado Floods Cause Mold Problems

Places that are often or always damp can be hard to maintain completely free of mold. If there's some mold in the shower or elsewhere in the bathroom that seems to reappear, increasing ventilation (running a fan or opening a window) and cleaning more frequently will usually prevent mold from recurri  read more..

Worker Safety During Fire Cleanup

Worker Safety During Fire Cleanup FACT SHEET On This Page Electrical Hazards Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Musculoskeletal Hazards Heavy Equipment Extreme Heat and Cold Unstable Structures Hazardous Materials Fire Working in Confined Spaces Worker Fatigue Respiratory Hazards First Aid Protective Equipme  read more..

Toxic Mold Decontamination Remediation

Concern about indoor exposure to mold has been increasing as the public becomes aware that exposure to mold can cause a variety of health effects and symptoms, including allergic reactions. This document presents guidelines for the remediation/cleanup of mold and moisture problems in schools and com  read more..

How To Clean Fire Smoke Damage

Tips on how to handle the fire damage There are companies that are experts in cleaning and/or restoring your personal items.Whether you or your insurer buys this type of fire service, Fire Damage How To Clean Fire Smoke Damage be clear on who will pay for it. 

Be sure to ask for an estimate of cost for t  read more..

Exterior Lead Based Paint Removal

How often should my blood lead level be checked? Blood lead level (BLL) describes the amount of lead in the blood, measured in micrograms per deciliter (µg/dL).The typical BLL for U.S. adults is less than 10 µg/dL. The New York State Department of Health recommends that:An initial blood lead t  read more..

Dehumidification

One place definitely going to see Mold Remediation Dehumidification is in the bathroom. The main culprit in this area is going to be believe it or not behind the tile in your shower. Because showers that have tile walls are usually placed over drywall, and have porous grout joints. The drywall behind is usually not as we  read more..

Floods

Is there any way to obtain a community-wide discount on the cost of flood insurance premiums? All communities in the NFIP adopt and enforce minimum standards for managing construction and development in their Special flood Hazard Areas. Some communities want to achieve a higher level of Flood Damage Floods&nb  read more..

How To Remove Mold On Drywall

I heard about "toxic molds" that grow in homes and other buildings. Should I be concerned about a serious health risk to me and my family?The term "toxic mold" is not accurate. While certain molds are toxigenic, meaning they can produce toxins (specifically mycotoxins), Mold Remediation How To Remove Mold On Drywall the molds them  read more..

Questions And Answers On Lead Poisoning

Does the paint and dirt at my house have lead in it? If your home was built before 1978 it may have been painted inside and outside with paint that has lead in it. The dirt outside of these homes may also have lead in it. Have your paint and dirt tested for lead. Call your local Lead Poisoning Preve  read more..

Animal Damage

Skunks are very well-known, nocturnal residents of most of the country. The common striped skunk, is characterized by prominent, lateral white stripes that run all the way down its back. Otherwise, the skunk’s fur is jet black, the body of the adult striped skunk is about the same size o  read more..