Water Extraction >> Water Damage Mitigation After Flood

Expertise in environmental inorganic and organic chemistry and bio geochemistry. Increase understanding of aquatic-ecosystem health by enhancing technical associations with regulatory agency program managers, government-agency researchers, Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and other research groups. 

Develop experience with two- or three-dimensional hydrodynamic Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and water-quality-modeling techniques.Specific models of interest include RMA2, RMA4,MD_SWMS, SRH-2D, RMA10 and U2RANS. 

The U.S. Geological Survey has the principal responsibility within the Federal Government to provide the hydrologic information Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and understanding needed by others to achievethe best use and management of the Nation's water resources.Hydrologic monitoring networks provide a foundation formeeting that responsibility. 

Among other things, Water Damage Mitigation After Flood hydrologic monitoring networks (1) facilitate the determination regional aquifer and streamflow statistics, (2) provide timely information that is used by planners and emergency personnel toassess and respond to floods and droughts, and (3) provide data that support a variety of surface-water and groundwater hydrologic assessments and research.

Goals Maintain Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and/or expand the hydrologic monitoring network so that we can collect the necessary data toprovide relevant and accurate regional information onaquifer and streamflow characteristics. 

Explore ways to reduce network maintenance costs,improve data reliability, and provide fast Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and efficient mechanisms for disseminating data in useful formats to our partners and the public.Strategies Actively promote the expansion of the statewide cooperative streamgage network to monitor stage, streamflow, and water quality. 

Maintain and enhance our ability to deliver real-timehydrologic information in a nationally consistent andorganized manner. Pursue new and better ways to disseminate real-timehydrologic information (for example, by means of theInternet, social-networking software, text messaging, Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and so forth). 

Maintain the existing USGS corporate hydrologicdatabasethe National Water Information System(NWIS and NWISWeb) and continue to quality-assurehistorical data and computed values. Maintain and improve the Ohio StreamStats application to facilitate estimation Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and/or dissemination ofsite-specific streamflow statistics. 

Increase technical associations with governmentagencies and research groups to promote the scientific understanding of the relation between environmental Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and climatic conditions and to raise awareness aboutwater-resources management issues. 

Through training and experience, maintain and enhancethe expertise of our hydrologists, engineers, and Water Damage Mitigation After Flood hydrographers in collecting and analyzing surfacewater and groundwater data. 

Encourage USGS technical support staff to continuethe enhancement and development of standard analytical tools available to evaluate hydrologic extremes,estimate traveltimes and recession rates, predict theprobable depths and timing of flood peaks, Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and statistically analyze streamflows and groundwater levels. 

Pursue opportunities and strategies to facilitate floodhazard warning and monitoring. Maintain readiness and expertise to support post flood assessments of water-surface profiles Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and peak flows. 

Increase use of, and expertise with, acoustic-based streamflow-measurement equipment to facilitaterapid and accurate streamflow measurements, thereby improving efficiency Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and productivity. 

Adopt and become proficient with tools and software(for example, PDA-based leveling software, GR-SAT,SWAMI, CHIMP) that improving efficiency and Water Damage Mitigation After Flood productivity in general gaging-station operations andrecords computation.

Staffing OutlookThe current scientific and technical staff of the Ohio WSC has the skills needed for the successful implementation of theScience Plan. Continued training Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and strategic future hires inspecific technical areas will enhance the current staff skills. 

TheWSC staff can and will be supplemented with USGS staff fromthe Biology, Geography, Geology, and/or Geospatial Disciplinecenters and other WSCs, as needed, Water Damage Mitigation After Flood to conduct multidisciplinaryand regional studies. 

Additionally, when appropriate, WSC staffwill collaborate with scientists and water managers from other agencies, as well as academia and the private sector, Water Damage Mitigation After Flood to meet theobjectives of the Science Plan. 

The U.S. Geological Survey, Ohio Water Science Center(WSC), conducted internal Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and external surveys to help assesscurrent science issues of importance to Ohio and the Nation.

Results of those surveys, along with information on nationally and regionally significant strategic science issues, Water Damage Mitigation After Flood were used to develop a science plan featuring five topical focus areas with associated science goals and potential strategies for meeting those goals. The five topical focus areas are the following:

1. Occurrence, distribution, and effects of emerging contaminants in surface-water and groundwater systems.2. Effects of climate change and water use on water availability, water quality, Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and stream biota.3. Identification, tracking, quantification, and prediction of theoccurrence of pathogens and microbiological indicators inenvironmental and treated waters.

4. Effects of anthropogenic activities on the physical, biological, and/or water-quality characteristics of streams and/or Water Damage Mitigation After Flood groundwater systems.5. Operation of hydrologic monitoring networks.The Science Plan will be used to set the direction of newand existing programs and will influence future training andhiring decisions by the USGS Ohio Water Science Center.

ReferencesU.S. Geological Survey, 2007, Facing tomorrow's challenges Water Damage Mitigation After Flood U.S. Geological Survey science in the decade 2007 to 2017:U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1309, 69 p., accessedAugust 21, 2009, at http://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/2007/1309/pdf/C1309.pdf.U.S. Geological Survey, 2004, 

Eastern Region SciencePlan: Internal document, 34 p., accessed August 21,2009, at http://internal.er.usgs.gov/docs/er_science_planver8-01-20-04.doc. The U.S. Geological Survey's Ohio Water Science Center (OHWSC) is Water Damage Mitigation After Flood currently developing its new Strategic Science Plan.

Through this process, the OH WSC hopes to identify specific scientific Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and technical water-resource programmatic areas and issues important to Ohio and the Nation.

The primary goal of the OH WSC Science Plan is to establish a multidisciplinary scientific Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and technical program thatgenerates relevant scientific products that meet or exceed our cooperator needs while supporting the goals and initiatives of USGS. 

The Science Plan will be used to set the direction ofnew programs in the OH WSC and be used in future training Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and hiring decisions.We value your organization's input and perspective as we go through this process. 

We thank you for agreeing to participate in this "look forward" to help us assess and define the major issues that will be relevant to Ohio water-resource professionals Water Damage Mitigation After Flood and decision makers in the next five years.Before answering the following eight questions you may wantto consider the following major water-resource perspectives: 

Regulatory Issues Recreation Needs Data Needs and Gaps Environmental Quality and Human Health Water Availability and Sustainability Hydrologic Systems, Surveillance, and Water Damage Mitigation After Flood Hazards1) What are the most important water-resource issuesfacing your organization within the next one- to twoyear period?2) 

What water-resource issues (needs) do you foreseeemerging in Ohio and Water Damage Mitigation After Flood the Nation relevant to yourorganization's mission/responsibilities within the nextfive-year period and beyond?

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