Water Damage >> Basement Flood Cleanup

When returning to your home after a hurricane or flood, be aware that flood water may contain sewage. Protect yourself and your family by following these steps:Inside the Home Keep children and pets out of the affected area until cleanup has been completed. Wear rubber boots, rubber gloves, and Basement Flood Cleanup goggles during cleanup of affected area. 

Remove and discard items that cannot be washed and disinfected (such as, mattresses, carpeting, carpet padding, rugs, upholstered furniture, cosmetics, stuffed animals, baby toys, pillows, foam-rubber items, books, Basement Flood Cleanup wall coverings, and most paper products). Remove and discard drywall and insulation that has been contaminated with sewage or flood waters. 

Thoroughly clean all hard surfaces (such as flooring, concrete, molding, wood and metal furniture, countertops, appliances, sinks, and other plumbing fixtures) with hot water and laundry or dish detergent. Help the drying process by using fans, Basement Flood Cleanup air conditioning units, and dehumidifiers. After completing the cleanup, wash your hands with soap and warm water. 

Use water that has been boiled for 1 minute (allow the water to cool before washing your hands).o Or you may use water that has been disinfected Basement Flood Cleanup for personal hygiene use (solution of ⅛ teaspoon [~0.75 milliliters] of household bleach per 1 gallon of water). Let it stand for 30 minutes. If the water is cloudy, use a solution of ¼ teaspoon (~1.5 milliliters) of household bleach per 1 gallon of water. 

Wash all clothes worn during the cleanup in hot water and detergent. These clothes should be washed separately from uncontaminated clothes and linens. Wash clothes contaminated with flood or sewage water in hot water and Basement Flood Cleanup detergent. It is recommended that a laundromat be used for washing large quantities of clothes and linens until your onsite waste-water system has been professionally inspected and serviced. 

Seek immediate medical attention if you become injured or ill.See also Reentering Your Flooded Home,Mold After a Disaster, andCleaning and Sanitizing With Bleach after an Emergency.Outside the Home Keep children and pets out of the affected area until cleanup has been completed. Wear rubber boots, rubber gloves, Basement Flood Cleanup and goggles during cleanup of affected area. 

Have your onsite waste-water system professionally inspected and serviced if you suspect damage. Wash all clothes worn during the cleanup in hot water and Basement Flood Cleanup detergent. These clothes should be washed separately from uncontaminated clothes and linens. After completing the cleanup, wash your hands with soap and warm water. 

Use water that has been boiled for 1 minute (allow the water to cool before washing your hands).o Or you may use water that has been disinfected for personal hygiene use (solution of ⅛ teaspoon [~0.75 milliliters] of household bleach per 1 gallon of water). Let it stand for 30 minutes. If the water is cloudy, Basement Flood Cleanup use solution of ¼ teaspoon (~1.5 milliliters) of household bleach per 1 gallon of water. 

Seek immediate medical attention if you become injured or ill.Health Risks Flood waters and standing waters pose various risks, including infectious diseases, chemical hazards, and injuries.Infectious Diseases Diarrheal Diseases Eating or Basement Flood Cleanup drinking anything contaminated by flood water can cause diarrheal disease. 

To protect yourself and your family: Practice good hygiene (handwashing) after contact with flood waters. Do not allow children to play in flood water areas. Wash children's hands frequently (always before meals). Do not allow children to play with toys that have been contaminated by flood water and Basement Flood Cleanup have not been disinfected. 

For information on disinfecting certain nonporous toys, visit CDC Healthy Water'sCleaning and Basement Flood Cleanup Sanitizing with Bleachsection.Wound InfectionsOpen wounds and rashes exposed to flood waters can become infected. To protect yourself and your family: Avoid exposure to flood waters if you have an open wound. Cover open wounds with a waterproof bandage. 

Keep open wounds as clean as possible by washing well with soap and clean water. If a wound develops redness, swelling, or drainage, seek immediate medical attention.For more information, Basement Flood Cleanup visit CDC’s Emergency Wound Care After a Natural Disaster.Chemical Hazards Be aware of potential chemical hazards during floods. 

Flood waters may have moved hazardous chemical containers of solvents or Basement Flood Cleanup other industrial chemicals from their normal storage places. Protect Yourself From Chemicals Released During a Natural Disaster Chemical Emergencies InjuriesDrowning Flood water poses drowning risks for everyone, regardless of their ability to swim. 

Swiftly moving shallow water can be deadly, Basement Flood Cleanup and even shallow standing water can be dangerous for small children.Vehicles do not provide adequate protection from flood waters. They can be swept away or may stall in moving water.Animal and Insect Bites Flood waters can displace animals, insects, and reptiles. To protect yourself and your family, be alert and avoid contact. 

Protect Yourself from Animal- and Insect-Related Hazards After a Disaster Wildlife in Disasters [FEMA]Electrical Hazards Avoid downed power lines. Protect Yourself and Others From Electrical Hazards After a Disaster Wounds Flood waters may contain sharp objects, Basement Flood Cleanup such as glass or metal fragments, that can cause injury and lead to infection.

After a hurricane, flood or other natural disaster you need to be careful to avoid electrical hazards both in your home and elsewhere. Nevertouch a fallen power line. Call the power company to report fallen power lines. Avoid contact with overhead power lines during cleanup and Basement Flood Cleanup other activities. Do not drive through standing water if downed power lines are in the water. 

If a power line falls across your car while you are driving, stay inside the vehicle and continue to drive away from the line. If the engine stalls, do not turn off the ignition. Warn people not to touch the car or Basement Flood Cleanup the line. Call or ask someone to call the local utility company and emergency services. Do not allow anyone other than emergency personnel to approach your vehicle. 

If electrical circuits and electrical equipment have gotten wet or are in or near water, turn off the power at the main breaker or Basement Flood Cleanup fuse on the service panel. Do not enter standing water to access the main power switch. Call an electrician to turn it off.

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