Mold Remediation >> Mold Abatement Regulations

This article presents remediation guidelines for building materials that have or are likely to have mold growth. The guidelines are designed to protect the health of cleanup personnel and other workers during remediation. These guidelines are based on the size of the area impacted by mold contamination. Please note that these are guidelines; some Mold Abatement Regulations professionals may prefer other remediation methods.

Certain circumstances may require different approaches or variations on the approaches described below. If possible, remediation activities should be scheduled during off-hours when Mold Abatement Regulations building occupants are less likely to be affected. Although the level of personal protection suggested in these guidelines is based on the total surface area contaminated and the potential for remediator or occupant exposure.

Professional judgment always should play a part in remediation decisions. These Mold Abatement Regulations remediation guidelines are based on the size of the affected area to make it easier for remediators to select appropriate techniques, not on the basis of research showing there is a specific method appropriate at a certain number of square feet. 

The guidelines have been designed to help construct a remediation plan. The remediation manager should rely on professional judgment Mold Abatement Regulations and experience to adapt the guidelines to particular situations. When in doubt, caution is advised. Consult an experienced mold remediator for more information.Level I: Small Isolated Areas(10 sq. ft or less) - e.g., ceiling tiles, small areas on walls.

Remediation can be conducted by the regular building maintenance staff as long as they are trained on proper clean-up methods, Mold Abatement Regulations personal protection, and potential health hazards. This training can be performed as part of a program to comply with the requirements of the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200).

Respiratory protection (e.g., N-95 disposable respirator) is recommended. Respirators must be used in accordance with the Mold Abatement Regulations OSHA respiratory protection standard. Gloves and eye protection should be worn. The work area should be unoccupied. 

Removing people from spaces adjacent to the work area is not necessary, but is recommended for infants (less than 12 months old), persons recovering from recent surgery, Mold Abatement Regulations immune-suppressed people, or people with chronic inflammatory lung diseases (e.g., asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and severe allergies).Containment of the work area is not necessary. 

Dust suppression methods, such as misting (not soaking) surfaces prior to remediation, Mold Abatement Regulations are recommended.Contaminated materials that cannot be cleaned should be removed from the building in a sealed impermeable plastic bag. These materials may be disposed of as ordinary waste.The work area and areas used by remediation workers for egress should be cleaned with a damp cloth or mop and a detergent solution.

All areas should be left dry Mold Abatement Regulations and visibly free from contamination and debris.Level II: Mid-Sized Isolated Areas(10-30 sq. ft.) - e.g., individual wallboard panels.Remediation can be conducted by the regular building maintenance staff. Such persons should receive training on proper clean-up methods, personal protection, and potential health hazards. 

This training can be performed as part of a program to comply with the Mold Abatement Regulations requirements of the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200).Respiratory protection (e.g., N-95 disposable respirator) is recommended. Respirators must be used in accordance with the OSHA respiratory protection standard. 

Gloves and eye protection should be worn.The Mold Abatement Regulations work area should be unoccupied. Removing people from spaces adjacent to the work area is not necessary, but is recommended for infants (less than 12 months old), persons recovering from recent surgery, immune-suppressed people, or people with chronic inflammatory lung diseases (e.g., asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and severe allergies).

Surfaces in the work area that could become contaminated should be covered with a secured plastic sheet(s) before remediation to contain dust/debris and prevent further contamination.Dust suppression methods, such as misting (not soaking) surfaces prior to remediation, Mold Abatement Regulations are recommended.

Contaminated materials that cannot be cleaned should be Mold Abatement Regulations removed from the building in a sealed impermeable plastic bag. These materials may be disposed of as ordinary waste.The work area and areas used by remediation workers for egress should be HEPA vacuumed and cleaned with a damp cloth or mop and a detergent solution.

All areas should be left dry and visibly free from contamination and debris. Level III: Large Isolated Areas(30 -100 square feet) - e.g., several wallboard panels. Industrial hygienists or other environmental health and Mold Abatement Regulations safety professionals with experience performing microbial investigations and/or mold remediation should be consulted prior to remediation activities to provide oversight for the project.

The following procedures may be implemented depending upon the severity of the contamination:It is recommended that personnel be trained in the handling of hazardous materials Mold Abatement Regulations and equipped with respiratory protection (e.g., N-95 disposable respirator). Respirators must be used in accordance with the OSHA respiratory protection standard (29 CFR 1910.134). 

Gloves and eye protection should be worn.Surfaces in the work area and Mold Abatement Regulations areas directly adjacent that could become decontaminated should be covered with a secured plastic sheet(s) before remediation to contain dust/ debris and prevent further contamination. Seal ventilation ducts/grills in the work area and areas directly adjacent with plastic sheeting.

The work area and areas directly adjacent should be unoccupied. Removing people from spaces near the work area is recommended for infants, Mold Abatement Regulations persons having undergone recent surgery, immunesuppressed people, or people with chronic inflammatory lung diseases. (e.g., asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and severe allergies).

Dust suppression methods, such as misting (not soaking) surfaces prior to mediation, Mold Abatement Regulations are recommended. Contaminated materials that cannot be cleaned should be removed from the building in sealed impermeable plastic bags. These materials may be disposed of as ordinary waste.The work area and surrounding areas should be HEPA vacuumed and cleaned with a damp cloth or mop and a detergent solution.

All areas should be left dry and visibly free from contamination and debris. When you use biocides as a disinfectant or a pesticide, Mold Abatement Regulations or as a fungicide, you should use appropriate PPE, including respirators. Always, read and follow product label precautions. It is a violation of Federal (EPA) law to use a biocide in any manner inconsistent with its label direction.

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