Flood Damage >> Things You Should Know About Floods

FLOOD OR DISASTER SANITATION INFORMATION The attached information will be of assistance to homeowners and citizens both during and after a flood or other disaster which effects private residences, water supplies, Things You Should Know About Floods and other facilities. 

The following information is intended as a quick guide to frequently asked questions and Things You Should Know About Floods concerns. Detailed information may be obtained at the local health department or the Indiana State Department of Health.The following information should provide guidance in dealing with disaster related issues:

1. Directions for Treating Water in Small Quantities. - These instructions should be followed if a safe water source is not immediately available.

2. Directions for Disinfecting Wells and Water Sources. - This information is necessary for the proper sanitizing of wells or other private water sources after the flooding has subsided, Things You Should Know About Floods and before thesupply is again put to use.

3. Salvaging Flood Damaged Food in the Home. - Information and direction relating to foods and Things You Should Know About Floods foodcontainers that may be safely salvaged.

4. Rehabilitation of Buildings, Furnaces, Furniture, Rugs, and Clothing. 

Information to assisthomeowners and others in salvaging household items and rehabilitating the structure for occupancyfollowing the disaster.Feel free to contact the Indiana State Department of Health or your local health department foradditional information. Things You Should Know About Floods

In emergencies, or as a temporary measure, water from contaminated or suspect sources can bedisinfected by either chlorination or boiling.

a. Secure safe drinking water from an approved or emergency source if possible. If notpossible, treat all water before drinking. Things You Should Know About Floods

b. If tap water is not clear, it should not be used. If a less turbid water source cannot be located,allow the water to stand in a container until the sediment settles and Things You Should Know About Floods pour off (decant) theclear water into a clean vessel.

2. Chlorination - Add six (6) drops of a liquid chlorine laundry bleach to one gallon of water and mix.Chlorine bleaches are inexpensive and can be secured from most grocery, discount, Things You Should Know About Floods or drug stores.

a. Wait thirty (30) minutes after adding the chlorine before using the water for drinking orcooking purposes.

b. If this treatment does not give the water a taste of chlorine, Things You Should Know About Floods the above quantities should bedoubled. Repeat the addition of chlorine until a slight taste of chlorine is present and use thisamount for future treatments.

c. The taste of chlorine is not particularly unpleasant and it will be evidence that the water issafe to drink. Things You Should Know About Floods

3. Boiling -The water may also be purified by boiling. In this method, bring the water to a full boil forat least five (5) minutes. Cool and Things You Should Know About Floods aerate the boiled water by pouring it through the air from oneclean container to another, or mixing rapidly with a clean utensil. Aeration will reduce the flat tastecause by boiling.

4. One of the above treatments should be continued until water of unquestioned quality can besecured. Remember that the safety of water cannot be judged by color, odor, Things You Should Know About Floods or taste. Theorganisms that cause water-borne disease cannot be seen.

5. Contact your local health department or Sanitary Engineering for assistance or advice. The following instructions are for the disinfection or treatment of wells and private water sources thathave been subjected to flood, storm water, Things You Should Know About Floods or other possible sources of contamination. If the wellcasing is submerged in flood water, DO NOT USE THE WATER. 

Water from submerged wells cannot be safely sanitized. When flood waters recede, small quantities may be disinfected until the wellcan be properly chlorinated. (See Directions for Treating Small Quantities of Drinking Water.)After flood waters recede, or the cause of contamination is eliminated, Things You Should Know About Floods wells can be disinfected withchlorine. 

A convenient form to use is sold commercially in grocery or other stores as liquid chlorinelaundry bleach. Most of these products contain 5.25 percent solution or more of sodium hypochloritewhen fresh, Things You Should Know About Floods and is equivalent to 5 percent available chlorine.

1. Determine the Amount and Add the Chlorine Disinfecting Solution.The quantity of chlorine solution needed to disinfect a well is based upon 100 parts of chlorine to amillion parts of water. To eliminate mathematical calculations, it is safe to use the following quantities and Things You Should Know About Floods methods to disinfect the different types, sizes, and depths of wells and water sources:

A. Drilled or Driven Wells - Use one quart of the commercial 5 percent chlorine solution foreach 100 feet of well depth in a drilled well which is four inches in diameter. For two-inchdriven wells, Things You Should Know About Floods or smaller, add one cup for each 25 feet of water.

1. The measured solution should be diluted with water to make about three (3) gallons.Water drawn from the contaminated well is suitable for this purpose. Things You Should Know About Floods

2. Pour the diluted chlorine solution directly into the casing of a single tubular well, Things You Should Know About Floods or intothe annular space between the outer casing and the drop pipe, of a double tubularwell.

3. If the well is sealed and the pump drop pipe is not equipped with a foot valve at thebottom, and does not have a cylinder in the way, it is also possible to pour the solutiondown through the pump and Things You Should Know About Floods drop pipe.

B. Dug Wells - Dug wells which have become contaminated should first be pumped dry,cleaned, Things You Should Know About Floods and the walls scrubbed down. If it is not possible to pump the well dry, the pumpingshould be continued until the water becomes clear. 

The well should then be allowed to fill,and, if the water is still not clear, it should be pumped out again. Cisterns, spring collection basins, Things You Should Know About Floods or drinking water storage tanks should bedisinfected in the same manner as dug wells. 

Pump out, or drain the water in the cistern;scrub down the interior walls; fill or allow the tank to refill with clear water; and, if it is notknown, calculate the capacity of the tank or Things You Should Know About Floods containment by using one of the followingformulas:

a. Square or Rectangular Tank measure in feet:Capacity (gallons) = Length x Width x Depth x 7.5b. Cylindrical Tank measure in feet:Capacity (gallons) = Diameter x Diameter x Length x 5.9. Allow Time for Disinfection of the Water Source and Distribution System. Things You Should Know About Floods

After the well, cistern, Things You Should Know About Floods or storage tank has been dosed with the appropriate amount of chlorine, itshould be pumped just long enough to bring the treated water through the pump to all faucets onthe distribution system. The odor at the faucets will be a good test to indicate chlorine presence. 

Directions For Disinfecting Wells And Water Sources

If the above dosages do not produce an obvious chlorine odor in the water, add more chlorinebleach solution until a distinct odor is noticed.Let the chlorinated well and Things You Should Know About Floods distribution system stand for 12 to 24 hours. 

This will allow time for thechlorine solution to disinfect the well, Things You Should Know About Floods or water source, and distribution system.After at least 12 hours, the system should be pumped to waste until no further trace of chlorine isnoticeable in the water.

If you have public or municipal sewers, run each tap until the disinfectant odor disappears, whileallowing the water to go down the fixture drain. If you have a septic system, it is preferable to firstconnect a garden hose to an outside faucet or Things You Should Know About Floods hydrant and run the water into a roadside ditch ordrainage swale, until the disinfectant odor disappears. 

Then, turn on each water faucet to dischargethe chlorine residual in the immediate vicinity of the faucet.

3. Sample the Water for Bacteriological Analysis Before UseFollowing disinfection of the water supply system, Things You Should Know About Floods the water should be sampled for bacteriologicalanalysis. 

Remember that no water should be used for drinking or food preparation, unless it is firstboiled or treated, until a satisfactory report is obtained from a laboratory. The safety of water cannotbe judged by color, odor, Things You Should Know About Floods or taste. The organisms that cause water-borne disease cannot be seen.

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