Lead Paint Removal >> Exposure To Lead

Lead is a naturally occurring element found in small amounts in the earth's crust. While it has some beneficial uses, it can be toxic to humans and animals causing of health effects.Where is Lead Found?Lead can be found in all parts of our environment – the air, the soil, the water, and Exposure To Lead even inside our homes. 

Much of our exposure comes from human activities including the use of fossil fuels including past use of leaded gasoline, some types of industrial facilities, and past use of lead-based paint in homes.Lead and lead compounds have been used in a wide variety of products found in and Exposure To Lead around our homes, including paint, ceramics, pipes and plumbing materials, solders, gasoline, batteries, ammunition, and cosmetics.

Lead may enter the environment from these past and current uses. Lead can also be emitted into the environment from industrial sources and contaminated sites, such as former lead smelters. While natural levels of lead in soil range between 50 and 400 parts per million, mining, smelting, and Exposure To Lead refining activities have resulted in substantial increases in lead levels in the environment, especially near mining and smelting sites.

When lead is released to the air from industrial sources or vehicles, it may travel long distances before settling to the ground, Exposure To Lead where it usually sticks to soil particles. Lead may move from soil into ground water depending on the type of lead compound and the characteristics of the soil. Federal and state regulatory standards have helped to minimize or eliminate the amount of lead in air, drinking water, soil, consumer products, food, and occupational settings. 

If your home was built before 1978, there is a good chance it has lead-based paint. In 1978, the federal government banned consumer uses of lead-containing paint, Exposure To Lead but some states banned it even earlier. Lead from paint, including lead-contaminated dust, is one of the most common causes of lead poisoning. 

Lead paint is still present in millions of homes, sometimes under layers of newer paint. If the paint is in good shape, Exposure To Lead the lead paint is usually not a problem. Deteriorating lead-based paint (peeling, chipping, chalking, cracking, damaged, or damp) is a hazard and needs immediate attention. It may also be a hazard when found on surfaces that children can chew or that get a lot of wear-and-tear, such as: Windows and window sills

Doors and door frames Stairs, railings, banisters, and porches Be sure to keep all paint in excellent shape and Exposure To Lead clean up dust frequently.Read about simple steps to protect your family from lead hazards (PDF) Lead in household dust results from indoor sources such as deteriorating lead-based paint. 

Lead dust can also be tracked into the home from soil outside that is contaminated by deteriorated exterior lead-based paint and other lead sources, Exposure To Lead such as industrial pollution and past use of leaded gasoline. Read more about lead dust. Renovation, repair or painting activities can create toxic lead dust when painted surfaces are disturbed or demolished.

Learn more about hiring lead-safe certified contractors. Pipes and solder — Lead is used in some water service lines and household plumbing materials. Lead can leach, or enter the water, as water flows through the plumbing. Lead pipes and lead solder were commonly used until 1986. Lead is naturally-occurring, Exposure To Lead and it can be found in high concentrations in some areas. 

In addition, soil, yards and playgrounds can become contaminated when exterior lead-based paint from houses or buildings flakes or peels and gets into the soil. Soil may also be contaminated from past use of leaded gasoline in cars, from industrial sources, Exposure To Lead or even from contaminated sites, including former lead smelters. 

Lead in soil can be ingested as a result of hand-to-mouth activity that is common for young children and from eating vegetables that may have taken up lead from soil in the garden. Lead in soil may also be inhaled if resuspended in the air, Exposure To Lead or tracked into your house thereby spreading the contamination. 

Check the exterior of your home, including porches and fences, for flaking or deteriorating lead-based paint that may contaminate soil in your yard or be tracked into your house. To avoid tracking contaminated soil into your house, put doormats outside Exposure To Lead and inside all entryways, and remove your shoes before entering. 

To reduce exposure to lead, after playing or working outdoors, EPA recommends that children and adults leave their shoes at the door or use door mats, and wash their hands. To keep children from playing in soil near your home, plant bushes close to the house. Also, older playground equipment can still contain old lead-based paint, Exposure To Lead and artificial turf and playground surfaces made from shredded rubber can contain lead. 

Take precautions to ensure young children do not eat shredded rubber, or put their hands in their mouth before washing them. Lead in household dust results from indoor sources such as old lead paint on surfaces that are frequently in motion or bump or rub together (such as window frames), deteriorating old lead paint on any surface, Exposure To Lead home repair activities.

Tracking lead contaminated soil from the outdoors into the indoor environment, or Exposure To Lead even from lead dust on clothing worn at a job site. Even in well-maintained homes, lead dust can form when lead-based paint is scraped, sanded or heated during home repair activities. Lead paint chips and dust can get on surfaces and objects that people touch. 

Settled lead dust can re-enter the air when the home is vacuumed or swept, or people walk through it. To reduce exposure to lead dust, it is especially important to maintain all painted surfaces in good condition, and to clean frequently, to reduce the likelihood of chips and dust forming. Using a lead-safe certified renovator to perform renovation, repair and Exposure To Lead painting jobs is a good way to reduce the likelihood of contaminating your home with lead-based paint dust.

Painted toys, furniture and toy jewelry— That favorite dump truck or rocking chair handed down in the family, antique doll furniture, or toy jewelry could contain lead-based paint or Exposure To Lead contain lead in the material it is made from. Biting or swallowing toys or toy jewelry that contain lead can cause a child to suffer from lead poisoning.

Freeze Dry Documents For Water Restoration

About 25 Alabama counties are already preparing loose marriage licenses, divorces, estate case files, and Confederate pension records for microfilming by the GSU. Another 15 counties have expressed interest in starting a loose records project. If your county government, historical society or genealo  read more..

How To Fix Water Damaged Carpet

In handling materials that are believed to be contaminated with asbestos it is recommended that, at a minimum, you wear personal protective equipment such as disposable coveralls, gloves, goggles, and most importantly, some form of respiratory protection. A basic dust mask or the N95 dust mask recom  read more..

How To Test For Lead Paint Poisoning

Appropriate follow-up medical examinations or consultations may also be provided for employees who have been temporarily removed from exposure under the medical removal protection provisions of the standard.(See Part IX, below.) The standard specifies the minimum content of pre-assignment and [  read more..

Tenant Trash Removal

BEFORE YOU RENT Before signing a lease agreement, prospective tenants should carefully read the lease and be sure they understand all of the requirements, provisions, rules, addendums, and laws that apply. If you have a question, ask the landlord and make sure you understand the answer, Tenant Move Out Cleanup Tenant Trash Removal and tha  read more..

Mold Damage House

Although not captured by the covariates or asthma stratification, it is possible that participants who had been inside but had not participated in clean-up were more susceptible to respiratory symptoms than were Water Damage Mold Damage House others. 

Such susceptible participants m  read more..

When Was Asbestos Banned?

Banned products and uses Under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA): Banned Manufacture, Importation, Processing and Distribution in Commerce of Certain asbestos-containing Products Corrugated paper Rollboard Commercial paper Asbestos Abatement When Was Asbestos Banned? Specialty paper Flooring felt. 

  read more..

Occupational Exposure To Lead

This section applies to all occupational exposure to lead, except as provided in paragraph (a)(2). (2) This section does not apply to the construction industry or to agricultural operations. (b) Definitions. Action Level. Employee exposure, without regard to the use of respirators, to airborne lead   read more..

OSHA Requirements For Crime Scene Cleanup

Fourth, the fact that nursing homes are subject to infection control requirements imposed by the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under the Medicare and Crime Scene Cleanup OSHA Requirements For Crime Scene Cleanup Medicaid programs and to infection control requirements of states doe  read more..

Fire Damage Guitar Restoration Tips

In some parts the sensitivity of the input/output ESD protection circuits increases with temperature and these circuits can be turned on easily, at lower and/or shorter voltage spikes, than at room temperature. For this reason, Electronic Restoration Fire Damage Guitar Restoration Tips special care should be taken to prevent possible power li  read more..

Recycling

Recycling Basics Recycling is the process of collecting and processing materials that would otherwise be thrown away as trash and turning them into new products. Debris Removal Recycling can benefit your community and the environment. Benefits of Recycling Reduces the amount of waste sent to landfills and incinerators.  read more..