Lead Paint Removal >> How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil

Did you know that many homes built before 1978 have lead-based paint? Lead from paint, chips, and dust can pose serious health hazards. Read this entire brochure to learn: How lead gets into the body About health effects of lead What you can do to protect your family Where to go for more How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil information 

Before renting or buying a pre-1978 home or apartment, How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil federal law requires: Sellers must disclose known information on lead-based paint or lead based paint hazards before selling a house. Real estate sales contracts must include a specific warning statement about lead-based paint. Buyers have up to 10 days to check for lead. 

Landlords must disclose known information on lead-based paint and How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil lead-based paint hazards before leases take effect. Leases must include a specific warning statement about lead-based paint. If you think your home has lead-based paint: Don't try to remove lead-based paint yourself. Always keep painted surfaces in good condition to minimize deterioration. 

Get your home checked for lead hazards. Find a certified inspector or risk assessor at epa.gov/lead. Talk to your landlord about fixing surfaces with peeling or chipping paint. Regularly clean floors, window sills, and How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil other surfaces. Take precautions to avoid exposure to lead dust when remodeling. When renovating, repairing, or painting, hire only EPA- or state approved Lead-Safe certified renovation firms. 

Before buying, renting, or renovating your home, How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil have it checked for lead-based paint. Consult your health care provider about testing your children for lead. Your pediatrician can check for lead with a simple blood test. Wash children's hands, bottles, pacifiers, and toys often. Make sure children eat healthy, low-fat foods high in iron, calcium, and vitamin C. 

Remove shoes or wipe soil off shoes before entering your house. Breathe in lead dust (especially during activities such as renovations, repairs, or painting that disturb painted surfaces). Swallow lead dust that has settled on food, food preparation surfaces, and How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil other places. Eat paint chips or soil that contains lead. 

Lead is especially dangerous to children under the age of 6. At this age, children's brains and nervous systems are more sensitive to the damaging effects of lead. Children's growing bodies absorb more lead. Babies and young children often put their hands and How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil other objects in their mouths. These objects can have lead dust on them. 

Women of childbearing age should know that lead is dangerous to a developing fetus. Women with a high lead level in their system before or during pregnancy risk exposing the fetus to lead through the placenta during fetal development. Lead affects the body in many How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil ways. It is important to know that even exposure to low levels of lead can severely harm children. 

In children, exposure to lead can cause: Nervous system and kidney damage Learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder, and decreased intelligence Speech, language, and How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil behavior problems Poor muscle coordination Decreased muscle and bone growth Hearing damage While low-lead exposure is most common, exposure to high amounts of lead can have devastating effects on children, including seizures, unconsciousness, and, in some cases, death. 

Although children are especially susceptible to lead exposure, lead can be dangerous for adults, too. In adults, How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil exposure to lead can cause: Harm to a developing fetus Increased chance of high blood pressure during pregnancy Fertility problems (in men and women) High blood pressure Digestive problems Nerve disorders Memory and concentration problems 

Muscle and joint pain Get your children and home tested if you think your home has lead. Children's blood lead levels tend to increase rapidly from 6 to 12 months of age, How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil and tend to peak at 18 to 24 months of age. Consult your doctor for advice on testing your children. A simple blood test can detect lead. 

Blood lead tests are usually recommended for: Children at ages 1 and 2 Children or other family members who have been exposed to high levels of lead Children who should be tested under your state or local health screening plan Your doctor can explain what the test results mean and How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil if more testing will be needed. 

In general, the older your home or childcare facility, the more likely it has lead-based paint. Many homes, including private, federally-assisted, federally owned housing, and childcare facilities built before 1978 have lead-based paint. In 1978, How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil the federal government banned consumer uses of lead-containing paint. 

Learn how to determine if paint is lead-based paint on page 7. Lead can be found: In homes and childcare facilities in the city, country, or suburbs, In private and public single-family homes and apartments, On surfaces inside and outside of the house, How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil and In soil around a home. (Soil can pick up lead from exterior paint or other sources, such as past use of leaded gas in cars.) 

Deteriorating lead-based paint (peeling, chipping, chalking, cracking, or damaged paint) is a hazard and needs immediate attention. Lead-based paint may also be a hazard when found on surfaces that children can chew or that get a lot of wear and tear, How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil such as: On windows and window sills Doors and door frames Stairs, railings, banisters, and porches 

Lead-based paint is usually not a hazard if it is in good condition and if it is not on an impact or friction surface like a window. Lead dust can form when lead-based paint is scraped, sanded, or How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil heated. Lead dust also forms when painted surfaces containing lead bump or rub together. Lead paint chips and dust can get on surfaces and objects that people touch. 

Settled lead dust can reenter the air when the home is vacuumed or How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil swept, or when people walk through it. EPA currently defines the following levels of lead in dust as hazardous: 40 micrograms per square foot (μg/ft2) and higher for floors, including carpeted floors 250 μg/ft2 and higher for interior window sills Lead in soil can be a hazard when children play in bare soil or when people bring soil into the house on their shoes. 

EPA currently defines the following levels of lead in soil as hazardous: 400 parts per million (ppm) and How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil higher in play areas of bare soil 1,200 ppm (average) and higher in bare soil in the remainder of the yard Remember, lead from paint chips—which you can see—and lead dust—which you may not be able to see—both can be hazards.

The only way to find out if paint, dust, or soil lead hazards exist is to test for them. The next page describes how to do this.You can get your home tested for lead in several different ways: A lead-based paint inspection tells you if your home has lead based paint and How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil where it is located. It won't tell you whether your home currently has lead hazards. 

A trained and certified testing professional, called a lead-based paint inspector, How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil will conduct a paint inspection using methods, such as: Portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) machine Lab tests of paint samples A risk assessment tells you if your home currently has any lead hazards from lead in paint, dust, or soil. 

It also tells you what actions to take to address any hazards. A trained and certified testing professional,called a risk assessor, How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil will: Sample paint that is deteriorated on doors, windows, floors, stairs,and walls Sample dust near painted surfaces and sample bare soil in the yard Get lab tests of paint, dust, and soil samples 

A combination inspection and risk assessment tells you if your home has any lead-based paint and if your home has any lead hazards, and where both are located.Be sure to read the report provided to you after your inspection or risk assessment is completed, and How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil ask questions about anything you do not understand. 

In addition to day-to-day cleaning and good nutrition, you can temporarily reduce lead-based paint hazards by taking actions, such as repairing damaged painted surfaces and planting grass to cover lead contaminated soil. These actions are not permanent solutions and How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil will need ongoing attention. You can minimize exposure to lead when renovating, repairing, or painting by hiring an EPA- or state certified renovator who is trained in the use of lead-safe work practices. 

If you are a do-it-yourselfer, How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil learn how to use lead–safe work practices in your home. To remove lead hazards permanently, you should hire a certified lead abatement contractor. Abatement (or permanent hazard elimination) methods include removing, sealing, or enclosing lead-based paint with special materials. 

Just painting over the hazard with regular paint is not permanent control. Always use a certified contractor who is trained to address lead hazards safely. Hire a Lead-Safe Certified firm (see page 12) to perform renovation, repair, or painting (RRP) projects that disturb painted surfaces. To correct lead hazards permanently, How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil hire a certified lead abatement professional. 

This will ensure your contractor knows how to work safely and has the proper equipment to clean up thoroughly.Certified contractors will employ qualified workers and How To Remove Lead Paint In Soil follow strict safety rules as set by their state or by the federal government.

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