Lead Paint Removal >> Removing Lead Pipes

Lead can enter drinking water through corrosion of plumbing materials, especially where the water has high acidity or low mineral content that corrodes pipes and fixtures. Homes built before 1986 are more likely to have lead pipes, fixtures and solder. However, new homes are also at risk: Removing Lead Pipes even legally "lead-free" plumbing may contain up to eight percent lead. 

Beginning January 2014, changes to the Safe Drinking Water Act will further reduce the maximum allowable lead content of pipes, pipe fittings, plumbing fittings, and fixtures to 0.25 percent. The most common problem is with brass or chrome-plated brass faucets and fixtures with lead solder, from which significant amounts of lead can enter into the water, Removing Lead Pipes especially hot water.

Corrosion is a dissolving or wearing away of metal caused by a chemical reaction between water and your plumbing. A number of factors are involved in the extent to which lead enters the water including the chemistry of the water (acidity and alkalinity), the amount of lead it comes into contact with, how long the water stays in the plumbing materials, and the presence of protective scales or Removing Lead Pipes coatings inside the plumbing materials.

To address corrosion of lead and Removing Lead Pipes copper into drinking water, EPA issued theLead and Copper Rule (LCR)under the authority of the Safe Drinking Water Act. The LCR requires corrosion control treatment to prevent lead and copper from contaminating drinking water. Corrosion control treatment means systems must make drinking water less corrosive to the materials it comes into contact with on its way to consumers' taps.

You could bring lead home on your hands or clothes, or Removing Lead Pipes contaminate your home directly if you: Work with lead and/or lead-based paint (for example, renovation and painting, mining, smelting, battery recycling, refinishing old furniture, autobody, shooting ranges). Have a hobby that uses lead (for example, hunting, fishing, stained glass, stock cars, making pottery).

Lead can be found in shot, fishing sinkers and jigs, came and solder used in stained glass, weights used in stock cars, dyes and glazes used in pottery, and many other places. If you have a job or Removing Lead Pipes hobby where you may come into contact with lead: never put leaded materials (for example, fishing sinkers, lead came or solder for stained glass or leaded pottery clay or glaze) in your mouth.

Avoid handling food or touching your mouth or face while engaged in working with lead materials and wash hands before eating or drinking following such activities, shower and change clothes before entering your vehicle or coming home, launder your work and hobby clothes separately from the rest of your family's clothes, and Removing Lead Pipes keep all work and hobby materials away from living areas.

Some folk remedies that contain lead, Removing Lead Pipes such as"greta" and "azarcon,"are used to treat an upset stomach. Some folk remedies for morning sickness, including "nzu", "poto" and "calabash chalk," contain dangerous levels of lead and other chemicals. Consuming even small amounts of lead can be harmful. Lead poisoning from folk remedies can cause serious and irreversible illness. 

If your home was built before 1978, have your home tested for lead and learn about potential lead hazards. Fix any hazards that you may have. You can get your home checked in one or Removing Lead Pipes both of the following ways: A paint inspection — Tells you the lead content of every different type of painted surface in your home, but does not tell you if the paint is a hazard or how to deal with it. 

This is most appropriate when you are buying a home or signing a lease, before you renovate, and Removing Lead Pipes to help you determine how to maintain your home for lead safety. A risk assessment — Tells you if there are any sources of serious lead exposure such as peeling paint and lead dust, and tells you what actions to take to address these hazards. 

This is most helpful if you want to know if lead is causing exposure to your family now. Have qualified professionals do the work.It is very important to care for the lead-painted surfaces in your home. Lead-based paint in good condition is usually not harmful. If your home was built before 1978: Regularly check your home for chipping, peeling, or deteriorating paint, and Removing Lead Pipes address issues promptly without excessive sanding. 

If you must sand, sand the minimum area needed, wet the area first, and clean up thoroughly. Regularly check all painted areas that rub together or get lots of wear, like windows, doors, and stairways, for any signs of deterioration. Regularly check for paint chips or dust – if you see some, Removing Lead Pipes remove carefully with a damp paper towel and discard in the trash, then wipe the surface clean with a wet paper towel. 

Wipe down flat surfaces, like window sills, at least weekly with a damp paper towel and Removing Lead Pipes throw away the paper towel. Mop smooth floors (using a damp mop) weekly to control dust. Remember to test for the presence of lead and lead hazards by a lead professional – this will tell you where you must be especially careful.

Here are more tips to help you reduce or prevent your family's exposure to lead dust. It's best to follow these steps weekly.Cleaning Uncarpeted Floors Do use: Damp mopping, Removing Lead Pipes with standard sponge or string type mops and an all-purpose cleaner. Standard vacuum cleaners if no visible dust or debris from chipping or flaking paint is present.

Don't use: Mops with a scrubber strip attached. Powered buffing or polishing machines, or vacuums with beater bars that may wear away the painted surface.Cleaning Carpets and Rugs Do use: Wet scrubbing or steam cleaning methods to remove stains. Standard vacuum cleaners if no visible dust or Removing Lead Pipes debris from chipping or flaking paint is present. Use only vacuums with HEPA filters otherwise.

Don't use: Dry sweeping of surface dust and debris. Shaking or beating of carpets and rugs.Cleaning or Dusting Walls and other Painted Surfaces Do use: Soft, dampened, Removing Lead Pipes disposable cloths with an all-purpose cleaner. Don't use: Steel wool, scouring pads, and abrasive cleaners. Solvent cleaners that may dissolve paint. Excessive rubbing of spots to remove them.

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