Debris Removal >> Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris

FEMA concurs with this recommendation. FEMA encourages PA applicants to use force account labor to conduct their debris removal operations. FEMA currently reimburses PA applicants for force account overtime hours. FEMA also reimburses applicants for the use of Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris equipment. Current FEMA regulations do not authorize the PA Program to reimburse force account straight time hours. 

Under the PA Pilot Program, Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris FEMA had the authority to fund an applicant's force account straight time for debris removal operations. FEMA is considering revisions to its regulations that would incorporate the force account straight time reimbursement component of the PA Pilot Program.Recommendation #5: 

Strengthen the requirements involved in monitoring contracts to ensure that no relationships exist between debris collection contractors and monitoring contractors, Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris and that monitors are properly trained and capable of independent and accurate performance. FEMA concurs with this recommendation. 

FEMA updated its debris contracting guidance in the September 27,2010 Recovery Fact Sheet 9580.201, Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris Debris Contracting Guidance. The Debris Monitoring Guide (FEMA 327) also provides applicants with monitoring guidance. Both documents stress that debris monitors should not have a relationship with debris removal contractors. 

Upon request from states, FEMA will provide debris monitoring training as part of the technical assistance that FEMA offers to PA applicants. Recommendation #6: Explore advanced technologies to supplement monitoring staff such as GPS in trucks or surveillance cameras. FEMA concurs with the recommendation in that FEMA supports applicants' use of relevant technology to improve their monitoring operations Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris and may provide reimbursement for utilizing such technologies. 

However, debris monitoring is the primary responsibility of PA applicants. FEMA does not concur with the recommendation to the extent that FEMA is not a party to contracts between applicants and contractors, and Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris cannot require the use of advance technologies monitoring tools. 

FEMA stays abreast of current technologies in order to provide appropriate technical assistance to Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris applicants when they are considering technology applications as a part of their monitoring operation. Recommendation #7: Assess weight-based rather than volume-based payment for debris collection and investigate whether such systems could be efficiently linked to debris payment accounting systems.

FEMA generally concurs with the recommendation, as FEMA currently accepts the use of weight-based systems as a basis for reimbursement. FEMA acknowledges that weight-based monitoring and payment systems have some advantages over volume-based systems. However, Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris as stated in the draft report, weight based systems are not immune from potential waste, fraud, or abuse and both weight-based and volume-based systems require proper monitoring and over sight to be effective. 

FEMA can provide funding for the use of temporary scales during debris operations and encourages applicants to utilize such systems where appropriate.Recommendation #8: Modify disaster assistance employee deployment processes to ensure that Incident Management Assistance Teams and other FEMA first responders include one or more debris specialists with the experience Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris and management skills to assist communities in the crucial early stages of planning and implementing debris removal activities.

FEMA concurs with the objective of the recommendation. Shortly after an emergency or disaster declaration, and in some cases in advance, FEMA deploys Debris Task Force Leaders and Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris establishes debris task forces to coordinate FEMA's debris operations. FEMA debris specialists and monitors are also deployed to disaster areas in advance or shortly after a declaration. 

FEMA also augments its field staff with debris contracting and monitoring specialists from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Each of these individuals works closely with impacted states and local applicants to provide them with technical assistance. However, Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris from FEMA's perspective, the best way to address this issue is to ensure that there are adequate numbers of skilled and experienced employees in the disaster workforce, rather than modifying deployment processes. 

FEMA will continue its efforts to increase the size of its resource pool and speed the deployment of technical expertise to support applicants during the early stages of planning Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris and implementing debris removal operations. Recommendation #9: Continue to refund cost data to determine whether having qualified FEMA or local personnel present in a debris towers, major staging areas, and on the ground as roving monitors during significant debris-generating events would be cost effective.

While FEMA fully supports appropriate and adequate monitoring as part of debris removal operations, Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris FEMA does not concur with this recommendation. FEMA advises PA applicants that the size of the monitoring operation should be commensurate with the size and needs of the debris removal operations. 

Applicants utilize different monitoring strategies based on the type of contract, the geographic area and Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris the types and quantity of debris. When using unit price contracts for example, applicants should have monitors present at the pick-up, staging, and disposal sites. FEMA employs a roving debris monitor methodology wherein debris monitors make regular, repeated and random checks of debris operations. 

FEMA then focuses additional attention and effort on debris operations with identified non-compliance issues. FEMA also uses additional debris monitors for special debris operations, Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris such as the removal of contaminated debris or debris removal from private property or waterways. This is the most prudent use of FEMA's resources and taxpayer dollars and avoids unnecessary duplication of effort.

FEMA does not intend to station monitors at a pick up, staging, or disposal sites as a standard operating procedure. In addition, due to the difficulty in determining cost savings from that approach, Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris it is unlikely that FEMA can perform a conclusive analysis to determine if that approach is more cost effective than FEMA's current practice.

Recommendation #10: Establish clear Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris requirements for prompt and efficient project closeouts. FEMA responded to this recommendation in "Opportunities to Improve FEMA 's Disaster Closeout Process, OIG-IO-49, January 2010. ,. FEMA has since developed a Project Closeout Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for use by PA staff at Joint Field Offices. 

However, the draft report on debris confuses the completion of a debris removal operation with project closeout. These are two discrete actions. Project closeout refers to the reconciliation of project estimates, data, documentation and Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris invoices with the approved scope of work. It is an administrative function that does not impede the completion of an applicant's debris removal operation. 

In accordance with Title 44, Code of Federal Regulations 206.204, "Project Performance", debris removal must be completed within six months of the emergency or Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris disaster declaration unless there are extenuating circumstances for which the impacted state or FEMA grant an extension. The draft report suggests that delayed project closeout encourages debris removal contractors to remove ineligible debris. 

However, this is not the case and adequate debris monitoring by the applicant prevents the removal of ineligible debris. Additionally, Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris FEMA encourages the use of unit price and lump sum contracts that pay contractors based on the amount of debris removed rather than the use of time and materials contracts which pay contractors based on the number of hours worked. 

The use of unit price or lump sum contacts along with debris monitors reduces the amount of ineligible debris collected. Time Best Way To Remove Hurricane Damage Debris and materials contracts that do not have "termination for cause" or "not to exceed' clauses encourage debris removal contractors to work slower or to remove ineligible debris.

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