Debris Removal >> Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal

Building demolition debris Approximately 300 houses in Lincoln County sustained damage amounting to more than 50 percent of the value of the house. Most of these homeowners chose to sell their properties to the county in a buyout and demolition program. FEMA and the state Community Development Block Grant program, which is connected with a Department of Housing and Urban Development program, Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal funded the program.

Once the county purchased the houses slated for demolition, county crews worked to remove and Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal separate salvageable or nonburnable items from the homes. Crews removed vinyl siding, windows, asphalt shingles, insulation, cabinets, appliances, furniture, electrical cables, piping, rafters, studs, and decks. 

The demolition contractor then had the option to sell or give away as much of these Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal materials as possible before disposing of what remained. The contractor then could easily demolish the shell of each house, which consisted almost entirely of wood.An air curtain burner combusted the demolition debris and unsalvaged items from the houses. 

Other debris was landfilled. Communication A mass mailing of over 1,000 letters was sent to residents in the Lincoln County floodplain. Information also was distributed through a local newspaper. The county's communication strategy differed for each of the three types of debris generated.Through phone calls and advertisements in local newspapers, Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal the county found farmers interested in taking the soil debris piled by the roadside. 

County crews removing soil from ditches delivered some of the soil to their farms.The county publicized the household debris collection program through public meetings, newspapers, and radio, Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal but ultimately word of mouth was the most effective communication mechanism. Signs on the road identified each collection site. 

The county informed residents 30 days prior to the closing of the Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal collection sites.A series of public meetings was held throughout the county to inform residents of the home buyout program. County staff responsible for assessing flood damage to houses met daily for breakfast from 6 to 7 a.m. at a centrally located restaurant in the flood area and welcomed homeowners to meet with them and learn about the buyout program. 

The county also notified residents of the program with posters at the same restaurant and at a resort community at the northern end of the flood area. As of July 1995, Lincoln County had completed over 250 buyouts, had demolished and Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal recycled over 200 homes, and was expecting to purchase and remove an additional 150 homes from the flood plain.

Outside Assistance The Boonslick Regional Planning Commission, a local government group, recruited staff for the collection sites and the pre-demolition salvage crews. US Department of Labor funds paid for these services through the Jobs Training Partnership Act program. Metro-Dade County, Florida — Hurricane Andrew Hurricane Andrew, which struck the Florida coast on August 24, 1992, Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal left an estimated 6 million tons of debris in Metro-Dade County (Greater Miami). 

This included downed trees and debris from 150,000 houses that were severely damaged or completely destroyed. Because of the extent of the destruction, Miami received help in collecting hurricane debris from USACE through FEMA. Since the hurricane, Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal to streamline the administration of hauling contracts in the event of future disasters, Metro-Dade County has issued an RFP for a contingency contract for various waste management activities. 

The RFP calls for two types of bids: one bid for a disposal site plus waste hauling services and one bid for a disposal site without waste hauling services. Metro-Dade County instituted a hurricane plan prior to the disaster and followed the plan's emergency debris collection guidelines. In accordance with the plan, Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal the county initially focused on both collection of garbage, because garbage can pose the greatest health risk, and clearing of the county's highways.

In the three weeks after the hurricane, Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal the amount of garbage set out by residents was double the pre-disaster amount as people in houses without electricity cleaned out spoiled food from refrigerators and freezers. County garbage collection crews worked seven days a week, 18 hours per day to collect garbage and clear debris from the streets.

A small number of county solid waste management employees initially could not report to work because they needed to make emergency repairs to their homes, obtain food for their families, or provide care to children or elderly dependents. In these cases, Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal other county employees offered assistance, thereby reducing the amount of time county employees were unable to perform their waste management duties.

Initially, the hurricane debris consisted mostly of downed trees. As citizens began their cleanup efforts, more household debris was collected (e.g., rain-damaged furniture). And as repairs began, the debris contained more C&D wastes (e.g., drywall and roofing tiles).The county asked residents to bring wood and yard waste, appliances, and metal to any of the county's 18 existing trash and Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal recycling drop-off centers. 

Wood and yard waste was chipped for mulch. Scrap dealers took appliances and metal. County officials asked residents to place other hurricane debris at the curb and to separate non-burnable waste from burnable waste.Soon the trash Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal and recycling centers were overwhelmed with debris. The county then opened neighborhood staging areas in parks and similar locations where residents could bring their wood waste. 

Approximately 500,000 tons of wood waste from the hurricane were mulched and distributed to agricultural areas, parks, and residential sites.The county Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal and USACE hired debris haulers to move debris from the curbs to staging areas. At each of the staging areas, personnel separated and inspected incoming loads and removed any hazardous waste. 

In the northern part of the county, the county government established 16 zones and assigned county resources to four zones, Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal contracting out the work in the remaining 12 zones to qualified local contractors. The county divided up the number of contracts equally to firms owned by Whites, African Americans, and Hispanics. 

USACE contracted debris removal work in 13 zones to six out-of-state contractors. Metro-Dade County contracted with a private firm to haul debris from all of the Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal staging areas to the private firm's landfills.The Florida Department of Environmental Regulation allowed debris to be burned under an emergency 30-day order. 

USACE used air-curtain burners that met all federal and state requirements. Some other local burn sites, however, Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal did not use state-of-the-art technology. Burning at these sites led to many public complaints and protests by environmental activists. As a result, county commissioners shut down all burning three weeks after it began. 

The major problem that arose during burning operations was commingled debris that did not burn efficiently. At USACE burn sites, the resultant ash was tested to determine if it was hazardous and Grants For Tornado Damage Tree Removal disposed of accordingly. After debris collection and staging areas were cleared of all debris, the county conducted soil and water testing for hazardous waste contamination.

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